Track Of The Day: Big Daisy – ‘Bee Mine’

A fuzzy guitar ode to those who embrace emotional labour in a relationship without hesitation, Belfast four-piece Big Daisy have shared their latest single ‘Bee Mine’. Lifted from the new charity compilation album Bangers & Breakupsthe track is a lo-fi appreciation of the selfless acts of love and support we receive in a relationship, even if past trauma makes us feel like we don’t deserve them.

Formed of childhood best friends Aidan Reynolds, Ciara King, Dan O’Rawe and James Orr, Big Daisy released their debut single ‘Go Outside’ in November 2019, unaware that their agoraphobic anthem would become an appropriate soundtrack for a global pandemic. The band’s ability to “hide painful stories inside catchy songs” is something they take pride in, and latest offering ‘Bee Mine’ is another stellar example of this talent. Described as a track that wears its “heart on its sleeve,” it’s an unconventional love song that rings with genuine warmth and charm.

It sits comfortably on the track-list for Bangers & Breakups, a heartbreak album made up of an eclectic mix of tracks from Irish & Northern Irish musicians, with contributions from Problem Patterns, Junk Drawer, Beauty Sleep, Arvo Party and more. All proceeds from the album will be donated to She Sells Sanctuary, a domestic violence charity based in Northern Ireland.

Listen to ‘Bee Mine’ below.

 

Follow Big Daisy on bandcamp, Spotify, Instagram, Twitter & Facebook for more updates.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

LISTEN: New Pagans – ‘Christian Boys’

A riotous, refreshing call for accountability and a take down of sexist double standards, Belfast band New Pagans have shared their latest single ‘Christian Boys’. It’s the first track to be lifted from their upcoming debut album The Seed, The Vessel, The Roots and All, which is set for release on 19th March via Big Scary Monsters.

Named in our Get In Her Ears ‘Ones To Watch in 2021‘ feature which we shared earlier this year, New Pagans create urgent, considered, catchy sounds that challenge the norms surrounding relationships, history and gender roles. The band take the best elements of post-punk, grunge and pop and transform them into beautifully melodic noise, and this is epitomised on new single ‘Christian Boys’.

Based on the experiences of vocalist Lyndsey McDougall’s friend – who had been having an affair with a Christian leader in Northern Ireland before his marriage to a virgin bride – ‘Christian Boys’ seethes with a righteous fury against the unfair judgement of women who are involved with hypocritical men. “This is shocking but what is more disturbing is that it hadn’t been the first-time similar stories had emerged,” the band explain about the context of the track. “When these men were confronted, they all stated that the women were to blame, it had been their fault, they were the sinners and had led the Christian men astray.”

The urgency in the repeated lyric “Christian boys are the worst I know / Christian girls should take it slow” exposes the hypocrisy underscoring the track’s narrative, calling out those who blame others for their own mistakes. “Lyndsey knows that some of the lyrics in the song could be considered controversial,” the band continue, “but she has grown up around Christian men and believes that this conversation needs to happen, it shouldn’t be off limits.”

Watch the accompanying lyric video for ‘Christian Boys’ below.

Pre-order New Pagans’ debut album The Seed, The Vessel, The Roots and All here.

Follow New Pagans on bandcamp, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook & Spotify for more updates.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

WATCH: New Pagans – ‘Yellow Room’

Following on from the release of their single Yellow Room in August, Belfast’s New Pagans have shared a captivating set of visuals to accompany their racing, urgent track. Directed by bassist Claire Miskimmin, the video reflects the often overwhelming feelings of darkness that women face in patriarchal society.

Inspired by the semi-autobiographical short-story The Yellow Wallpaper, which was written by American feminist author Charlotte Perkins Gilman, New Pagans originally penned the track to highlight the need for a specialised parent-and-baby mental health unit in Northern Ireland. “’Yellow Room’ is the fourth instalment in a series of self-made folk horror themed short films produced to accompany our music,” explains vocalist Lyndsey McDougall. “Set in the stunning local surroundings of Northern Ireland, we tried to evoke a sense of dread and isolation in the expanse of nature. In stifling a woman’s mind we take away her liberty, as in the novel the song is based on. It’s about the facade and the masks we wear, but break the surface and we find our protagonist’s strength. She cuts herself free and is set adrift.”

Watch the video for ‘Yellow Room’ below and follow New Pagans on bandcampFacebook & Spotify for more updates.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

LISTEN: New Pagans – ‘Yellow Room’

A racing, urgent exploration of the isolation new mothers often face, Belfast band New Pagans have shared their latest single ‘Yellow Room’. Inspired by the semi-autobiographical short-story The Yellow Wallpaper, written by American feminist author Charlotte Perkins Gilman, the band have penned the track to highlight the need for a specialised parent-and-baby mental health unit in Northern Ireland.

After watching her close friends struggle with post-natal depression, New Pagans’ vocalist Lyndsey McDougall decided to speak out about the silencing of motherhood, especially in music. McDougall saw parallels between the experiences of her friends and the character in Gilmans’ original story, in which the mental health of the female protagonist deteriorates rapidly when she is separated from her normal life, locked in an old nursery room by her physician husband. Through the medium of Gilmans’ text, McDougall channels these feelings of fear and rage in her clear, cathartic vocals, supported by the band’s crashing percussion and charged, powerful riffs.

Being a Mother herself, McDougall is aware of the pressures that come with the role, and whilst she is not solely defined by these responsibilities, she feels they shouldn’t be ignored or played down. By using personal experience and Gilmans’ text as foundations for ‘Yellow Room’, New Pagans are challenging and updating the narrative around women’s mental health, and they’ve crafted a catchy, energetic post-punk tune in the process.

Listen to ‘Yellow Room’ below and follow New Pagans on bandcamp, Facebook & Spotify for more updates.

 

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut