Introducing Interview: Anna Krantz

Having just released the third single from her latest series New Moon, New Tune, Dublin-based artist Anna Krantz has just released a beautiful new single.

Written on Zoom with friend and co-producer Simon Johnson, ‘The Trouble With Suzie’ flows with twinkling country-inspired melodies and Krantz’ smooth rich vocals, creating a heartfelt shimmering alt-pop gem.

We caught up with Anna to find out more…

Hi Anna, welcome to Get In Her Ears! Can you tell us a bit about yourself?
Hi! Thanks for having me. I’m a born and bred Londoner, currently living with my partner in Dublin. I’m really happy to be in Dublin as Irish music was a huge influence for me growing up. So, this is a fun adventure. Although I’ve been quite homesick through lockdown with not being able to travel home as much.

How did you initially decide to start creating music?
It wasn’t really a decision. I sat at a piano when I was eight years old and a song just kind of fell out of me. I’ve been writing ever since. 

Your beautiful new single ‘The Trouble With Suzie’ is out now – can you tell us what it’s all about?
Suzie is a fictional character who represents those unadvisable decisions we all make from time to time. She does the things she knows are bad for her over and over again because they just feel so good!

You’ve been compared to the likes of Suzanne Vega and Fleetwood Mac, but who would you say are your main musical influences?
My main influences change every time I answer because there are so many! However, they always include Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Fleetwood Mac and Van Morrison.

What music scenes are you into – offline and online?
I used to live in Nashville and it’s like a second home to me now. Many of my friends live there, including my best friend Lucie Silvas. I’m always inspired by what’s coming out of Nashville. 

How are you connecting with your audience and other musicians during the pandemic?
 Zoom. Zoom. Zoom.

And how do you feel the music industry is for new artists at the moment – would you say it’s difficult to get noticed?
I’d say it’s very difficult until it isn’t, if that makes sense? So many people are releasing music, more than ever before, so the odds of rising to the surface are very low. However, there are also far more ways to be seen these days and sharing music is easier than ever.

As we’re a new music focused site, are there any other upcoming artists that you’d recommend we check out?
YES! How long have you got?! Fancy Hagood (a good friend of mine) has some incredible new music out. His music and his heart move me to tears of joy every time I listen. Check out Kree Harrison too. She has a voice like butter, covered in maple syrup and sprinkled with fairy dust. Really traditional country sound with modern lyrics and relatable sentiments. 

Finally, what does 2021 have in store for you?
First and foremost, a trip home to see my family! What’s more important than that? I’d like to release a full length album next year too. Meanwhile, I have more singles planned for release in the early part of the year.

Massive thanks to Anna for answering our questions! Listen to ‘The Trouble With Suzie’ below:

 

Track Of The Day: Kynsy – ‘Happiness Isn’t A Fixed State’

Through jagged guitar riffs and succinct lyricism, Dublin-based artist Kynsy offers a fresh perspective on a breakup on latest single ‘Happiness Isn’t A Fixed State’. Balancing a painful reality with a buoyant optimism, the multi-instrumentalist navigates the push and pull between the head and heart, post-relationship.

“It’s about accepting the fact that sometimes you have to laugh the pain away, or look at negativity head on in order to feel positive emotions and have positive thoughts again,” explains Kynsy (aka Ciara Lindsey). “It’s a tug of war between the positive and negative thought processes that occur when a relationship ends.” Kynsy tackled writing and co-production duties head on with this single, enlisting the help of mixer Claudius Mittendorfer (Interpol, Sorry, Parquet Courts) to add a sheen to her edgy sound.

The track is also accompanied by a self-directed video, shot in Dublin by Tim Shearwood featuring Kynsy and her friends. “[The visuals] needed to be fun and playful but with moments of emotional vulnerability in there too,” Kynsy explains. “A sort of ying and yang of simple fun against complex emotions.”

Check out the video below and follow Kynsy on Spotify & Instagram for more updates.

Photo Credit Paula Trojner

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

INTERVIEW: Rising Damp

A creator of brutal yet captivating soundscapes, Dublin based artist Rising Damp describes her recent EP, Petrol Factory, as “the quaking barrier between the end of the end of time and the end of the world.” Her dystopian visions are fleshed out with hypnotic electronics, dense drum beats and deadpan vocal delivery, and her live performances are a blend of improvised sounds and intriguing visuals.

We caught up with Rising Damp (aka Michelle Doyle) to talk about her recent EP, what she’s been creating during lockdown, and her upcoming contribution to A Litany Of Failures: Vol. III, an eclectic compilation album of music from grassroots Irish artists which is set for release on 2nd October…

 

Hello Michelle! Your EP Petrol Factory was recently featured in The Quietus’ 2020 ‘Albums Of The Year So Far‘ chart. What are you most proud of about this record?

I’m most proud about the journey of the album. Most songs were made in response to live gigs, and were never cast in stone, always improvised. Playing to bigger audiences forced me to have to professionalise my practice. It has made me think more visually about the stage show, creating of the band and a how video links this all.

Do you have a favourite track? If so, why?

My favourite song is ‘The Bank’. It was composed as part of an exhibition exploring subculture in Ireland. In Dublin, all the punks, skins and goths used to hangout at Central Bank, in the city centre. I was a late stage central banker and started hanging out as hoardings and gates went up to stop young people sitting on the steps. The Bank is a landmark of Irish modernism, but also where protests would start or finish and where Occupy was. The place is a site of both financial institution and protest. Everything that is done to Central Bank is to further the hostile architecture around it and create a fortress. The song is about building this space and the tension of holding onto it.

 

During lockdown you were recording shows for Dublin Digital Radio, playing tracks by Throbbing Gristle, Gazelle Twin & Nyx Drone Choir (all GIHE faves). Talk us through how you curated these shows and what you enjoyed most about recording them.

Often I curate a show by taking one theme and building a repository around it. For example, I did a vocal special about people using voice as an instrument without singing. Sometimes I approach the show as research for songwriting. Other times I just want to play some high energy music. I’m using Mixxx as I can’t access the DDR studio at the moment. I miss the cdjs and the tactile way they can make you create tunes on the fly.

How have you been coping during the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic generally? Any advice for similar bands or artists who may be struggling right now?

My own feeling has been to reassess what your output should be. I was working on a live band towards playing festivals, and arranging with them and practising twice a week. When lockdown came, we had to stop and only got back in in May. Now we are taking a break during phase 3 again. As we can’t play live gigs, we are going to get back in to the studio and re-record songs from Petrol Factory as a live band and put them out. We’re also aiming to create videos to accompany. My most prized possession as a teenager was music video VHS and DVDs. I especially liked Sonic Youth’s for a DIY video art aesthetic. So trying to use the time now as a time for writing, editing and creating visual art.

Something positive during this time is your contribution to A Litany Of Failures: Vol. III. Your single ‘Cannibal’ features on the record. Talk us through what the track’s about and why you chose it for the compilation.

‘Cannibal’ came from playing in clubs between DJs who were DJing “hard drum” music. Originally it began as a jam and the lyrics came from a time I had just been in the dentist for an emergency tooth pull. A wisdom tooth was tearing flesh in my mouth, and gave me a serious infection. I’d written part of the song and finished it during the first lockdown. It seemed to change and become about feeding off past experiences and thoughts while isolated. Vocals recorded at home during lockdown were always pulled back as I live in a large group house.

Besides your own track, do you have a favourite track or a favourite band that also features on the compilation?

I love the Grave Goods and Extravision songs. It’s a great release, I’m super excited to be on vinyl.

What else is on the horizon for Rising Damp during these “unprecedented” times?

I’m putting together applications for exhibition/gigs in galleries where I can design a set, lighting and objects. Working on videos and new songs always.

Finally, are there any bands or artists you’d like to give a shout out too?

One artist who has a huge output and amazing energy is God Knows. I’m so impressed by his ability to keep exploring sound and switch things up. I love that he’s super attentive to his scene, is the opposite to a gatekeeper and is constantly bringing people in from all around Ireland. He’s a total supporter and great musician.

I also urge everyone to checkout Fulacht Fiadh, Salac, Dylan Kerr, Lastminuteman and Maria Somerville. Right now I’m buzzing off listening to the labels Chicago Research and Detriti Records.

Thanks to Michelle for answering our questions.
Follow Rising Damp on bandcampFacebook and Instagram for more updates.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

Track Of The Day: Ailbhe Reddy – ‘Looking Happy’

Transforming the crushing sadness that comes with seeing your ex “enjoying” their life on social media without you into a buoyant alt-folk gem, Ailbhe Reddy has shared her latest single ‘Looking Happy’. Lifted from her upcoming debut album Personal History, which is set for release on 2nd October, the track taps into the feelings of inadequacy we all experience when the FOMO unexpectedly hits us while scrolling through our ex’s newsfeed.

“We should all know by now that what people present online is a shiny happy version of events, but sometimes it’s impossible to have that logic when you’re hurting,” explains the Dublin-based musician. “Most people have probably ended up scrolling through the online profile of an ex and feeling like their life is full of fun parties and holidays, because that’s all people show of their life online.” Reddy’s willingness to expose these well known but often ignored behaviours is what makes ‘Looking Happy’ so painfully relatable.

Fortunately, Reddy has given fans a healthy dose of humour to offset the track’s sad context in the form of a child’s birthday party in the accompanying video for ‘Looking Happy’. “I’ve been to a lot of parties in my life where I feel bummed out but put on a happy face, so I thought it would be funny to have all these fun scenarios and look really glum,” she explains. “The blooper reel is definitely longer than the music video itself as it was incredibly difficult to keep a straight face on the bouncy castle!”

Watch the video for ‘Looking Happy’ below and follow Ailbhe Reddy on bandcampSpotify & Facebook for more updates.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut