FIVE FAVOURITES: Lia Braswell (A Place To Bury Strangers)

Brooklyn’s A Place To Bury Strangers have been launching sonic assaults on the eardrums of their cult following for over a decade. Driving the trio’s sound is drummer Lia Braswell; who plays with a raw, punishing, and unpredictable style that’s best appreciated live.

If you’ve never experienced APTBS’s live show, you now have access to the next best thing: London’s Fuzz Club recorded a live session with the band last year and have released the recording exclusively on vinyl (available for purchase here).

We wanted to know more about what drives Lia to be the expert musician that she is, so we asked her to share her “Five Favourite” albums with us. Check out her choices below, and make sure you watch the Fuzz Club recording of ‘Punk Back’ at the end of this post too!

1. The Slits – Cut
When I first listened to this album, it changed my perspective of how punk music could sound. Primal, evocative, sensual but also very feminine. Something like an album that either came out of an imaginative shower or a communal dance around a bonfire, both introspective yet objective and literate. Initially, it was the album that I was searching for all throughout my angsty and awkward junior high school years, but didn’t find until after I was out of school. Then again, it might have inspired me to drop out before graduating!

2. Scout Niblett – The Calcination of Scout Niblett 
Simple, jagged, heavy. This album CUTS. It’s the inner snarky child who takes back their power and runs with it as an awakened grown up. After my roommate and I discovered that we have a mutual love for Scout, we busted out this record and started interpretive dancing to all the motions of fuzzed out guitar bends and primal drum breakdowns. This album brings so much raw emotion into an empowering force of self-affirming vigilance. Hell YES.

3. Broadcast – Future Crayon
Enchanting, subjective, expansive. What a beautiful masterpiece of subtle psychedelia mixed with dreamscapes that continue to resonate in the mind long after listening to the record. Such looseness in the drums, atmospheric bliss all around, and one of the most controlled and calming voices that graced this planet for far too short a life. It dials my heartbeat into a harmonious wake of contentment.

4. Max Roach and Oscar Brown Jr. – We Insist! Freedom Now Suite 
This is the album that makes jazz what it means to me. Historical, melodic, passionate, and rhythmic. What a powerful album. It is rich with so much history and depth. No matter how many times you listen, you still can’t break into it. You can’t break it down. It is still alive. It is still so real and raw nearly sixty years after it was recorded. This is the kind of album that should be explored in educational institutions and should remain to be one of the most prolific records ever to have been recorded.

5. Department of Eagles – In Ear Park
A bit out of left field here, but this album was pretty essential to my life when it first came out. The melodies, the harmonies, the rhythm of the album catches me in a way that not many other albums have. It evokes a melancholy wrapped up in a waltz of dreamscapes along a tired river. I will most likely listen to this album when I am sixty years old and suddenly memories that were long forgotten will suddenly appear as if they were of the yesterdays.

Huge thanks to Lia for sharing her favourites. We’ve got some listening to catch up on! Follow A Place To Bury Strangers on Facebook for more updates.

VIDEO PREMIERE: Medicine Boy – ‘Bottom Of The Blue’

Berlin-based duo Medicine Boy have shared new visuals for their single ‘Bottom Of The Blue’ and were delighted to be premiering it here on GIHEs. Formed of André Leo and Lucy Kruger, the pair released their latest album Lower via Fuzz Club at the beginning of October, and are currently touring the UK before moving on to play a host of EU shows.

We caught up with Lucy to talk about her ‘Five Favourites’ – five artists or albums that have influenced her songwriting technique. Check out her responses below, and make sure you watch the brand new video for ‘Bottom Of The Blue’ too!

I have never been someone who has been able to approach music/writing with a particular style or reference in mind. Things sort of fall out of me or they don’t. I like the idea that listening to something obsessively means somehow embodying it. There is a small (or not so small) shift in the way you think/feel/listen that will inevitably come through in the things you create. These are five albums that found me at certain pivotal points in my life – both musically and personally.

1. Joni Mitchell – Blue
I was sixteen the first time I heard Joni Mitchell. Or at least the first time I really listened to her. It was evening and I was lying on my bed and it felt like she was in my room with me. I was overwhelmed by the intimacy, the feeling of companionship. The kind of music that hurts you and holds you. And heals you. This record has scored most of my adult life and so every listen gets a little fuller. It is home and a constant reminder to remain honest.

2. Kate Bush – Hounds of Love
I fell in love with Kate Bush when I was very little. Her music excited me. I found her strange and intriguing. She seemed to be full of magic. As if she was an angel or a fairy or
something. She remains that presence in my life. So wild and full of feeling. She makes me want to dance and weep. She makes me feel braver about experimenting with expression.

3. Nirvana – In Utero
I suppose this was the first time music served a truly cathartic purpose for me. A vessel for deeply uncomfortable fifteen year old feelings. To be able to find and create beauty in the disconcerting and disturbing. This has always stuck with me. Music that allows you to feel seen, in all of your states. Particularly those that you are expected to keep more private.

4. Lark – Razbliuto
Lark is a South African alternative electronic band fronted by Inge Beckmann. I discovered them when I was in University and became a little obsessed. I would have done so had they not been South African but it was extremely meaningful to have something so inspiring so close to home. Their music is dark and driving and full of beauty. Melancholic, glitchy and gothic. I fell in love before seeing them live. And then I saw them live and was completely bewitched. Inge has an incredible presence. There is a force and freedom that is intoxicating. She is a punk and a poet.

5. Gillian Welch – Time (The Revelator)
This is an anchor of mine. There is a weight and a warmth in it that makes me feel safe and open and alive. It is stripped and essential and so very steady. The songs seem to fall out of Gillian and Dave and into each other. The last track is 14 minutes long and I am so grateful for all those seconds.

Medicine Boys UK Tour Dates 2018
23/11 – London (UK) – The Waiting Room
24/11 – Cardiff (UK) – The Moon
25/11 – Bristol (UK) – The Lanes

Order your copy of Lower here.
Follow Medicine Boys on Facebook for more updates.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut