GIHE Illustrated: Celebrating Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Following on from our International Women’s Day feature about PJ Harvey, illustrator Sally-Anne Hickman has continued her focus on ‘sheroes’ by looking at the ‘black queer mother of rock ‘n’ roll’, Sister Rosetta Tharpe. Listen to some of her pivotal performances, and find out more about just how innovative an artist she was through Sally-Anne’s wonderful illustrations.

Sally-Anne Hickman
@sallyshinystars

Re-Covered: Sally Anne’s Favourite Illustrated Albums

If you’re anything like us, throughout Lockdown you may have been seeking refuge in some of your favourite records, perhaps rediscovering some old classics along the way. So, for this new feature, illustrator Sally-Anne Hickman re-imagines her favourite ten albums of all time by painting their covers in her own unique style, using watercolours.

Check out the last of Sally-Anne’s choices below!

PJ Harvey – To Bring You My Love
PJ Harvey is a storyteller. This album is a macabre mix of chilling tales told over an unnerving organ and bluesy guitar. Harvey uses biblical imagery in her lyrics, she sings of the dry earth and hell, managing to somehow show a vulnerability in her strong raw vocals. The album is a display of her song writing mastery, PJ Harvey unleashes musical theatrics and melodrama and proves that quiet is just as powerful and disturbing as loud.

 

Sally-Anne Hickman
@sallyshinystars

Re-Covered: Sally Anne’s Illustrated Favourite Albums

If you’re anything like us, throughout Lockdown you may have been seeking refuge in some of your favourite records, perhaps rediscovering some old classics along the way. So, for this new feature, illustrator Sally-Anne Hickman re-imagines her favourite ten albums of all time by painting their covers in her own unique style, using watercolours.

Check out the penultimate of Sally-Anne’s choices below, and keep your eyes peeled for the grand finale next week! 

Tori Amos – Boys for Pele
A child prodigy, an adult goddess. The profound female power of Amos seeps out in every bang and thrust on to her keys. Amos creates a dark magic with the punching sounds of the harpsichord and banshee-like wailing about devils and bleeding. Pele is a Hawaiian fire goddess who likes to eat men but it’s not just the patriarchy that gets smashed in this album. In her personal lyrics, Amos criticises almost all world religions, making this an album of spiritual rock and roll.

Sally-Anne Hickman
@sallyshinystars