Get In Her Ears Live @ The Finsbury w/ Crumbs, 10.05.19

Following a host of amazing bands playing for us lately, including Mammoth Penguins, ARXX, Wolf Girl, Sit Down and Fightmilk, we were back at The Finsbury on Friday with another dream of a line-up, for a jam-packed night of the best new music from awesome womxn.

Kicking things off is Birmingham born, London-based artist Rookes. Oozing a sparkling, magnetising charisma, she takes full command of the stage, delivering her electro-infused anthemic pop, as the subtle power of her shimmering vocals flows into our ears.

Next up, London duo Sophie Peacock and Natalie Healey – aka Panic Pocket – treat our ears to their twinkling indie-pop. Interspersing each uplifting ditty with charming cat-filled tales, it’s impossible not to be instantly cheered whilst singing along to their infectious, synth-filled melodies and refreshing, tongue-in-cheek wit.

Having not seen third band of the night live before, I was not prepared for just how intoxicatingly powerful Charismatic Megafauna‘s performance would be. Delivering their unique, percussion-filled electro-punk, all-the-while swapping instruments, they blast out empowering, patriarchy-smashing anthems, covering topics from sexual abuse, to diet foods and female ejaculation. Completely breathtaking.

Headliners Crumbs continue to wow the packed-out venue with their fiery post-punk. With funk-fused basslines, scuzzy hooks and impassioned vocals, they ooze a gritty, buoyant power which has the whole crowd buzzing and bouncing with enthused energy.

Massive thanks to the four bands and artists who played for us on Friday; you were all absolutely incredible. It was such a great night filled with amazing live music and the best of vibes! And make sure you don’t miss our next night at The Finsbury on 14th June with headliners CLT DRP.

 

Mari Lane
@marimindles

ALBUM: Big Joanie – ‘Sistahs’

DIY punks Big Joanie release their debut album Sistahs today, and it’s a mix of the personal and political; coupled with riotous rhythms and a sistah-hood ethos. Recorded at Hermitage Works Studio with producer Margo Broom, and released via Thurston Moore and Eva Prinz’s new label (The Daydream Library Series), Sistahs is a strong debut from a band who have been actively working on and off-stage within London’s DIY scene for years.

Together, Steph, Estella & Chardine have been busy running the Decolonise Fest for punks of colour, volunteering at Girls Rock Camp, and leading the Stop Rainbow Racism campaign, which works to stop racist performances in LGBTQ venues. Their combined pro-active efforts have resulted in the creation of 11 songs that tackle issues of self-motivation, race, equality, and letting go of unhealthy relationships.

The pensive and highly relatable opening track ‘New Year’ brims with a quiet yearning to kick start something, to stop waiting. It’s followed by ‘Fall Asleep’, with its infectious bass lines and wicked guitar riffs. The introduction of electronics 1:44 minutes in is ultra cool, and was inspired by the likes of Joy Division and New Order (which is why Producer Margo added a wall of synths and drum beats).

‘Used To Be Friends’ is an anthem everyone can sing with confidence, with a sarcastic smile and no real sense of aggro – just the care free attitude of someone who’s shed the skin of an unhealthy acquaintance. ‘Eyes’ is a cacophony of guitars, percussion, and recorder. It’s one of the first songs guitarist Steph wrote aged nineteen, inspired by her disdain for “working a part time job handing out over-priced artisan bread at Waitrose”.

‘Way Out’ is a wonderful, reverb-soaked, 90s-esque tune, whilst the brief ‘Down Down’ spirals along with its driving percussion for just shy of two minutes, before the surf-pop-style ‘Tell A Lie’ lifts listeners up again. Much like ‘Used To Be Friends’, ‘Token’ laments an unhealthy friendship, although this time it’s about the feeling of ‘tokenism’ experienced by people of colour, when middle class white people decide to befriend them as a lame act of liberalism. Following track ‘It’s You’ was born from a bad situation. After the lead singer from Steph’s first band (My Therapist Says Hot Damn) left just three days before their next gig – ‘It’s You’ was one of the many songs she had to write from scratch to play at the show.

The penultimate ‘How Could You Love Me’ will have you swaying from side-to-side as it rings out in “60s girl group style”, whilst closing track ‘Cut Your Hair’ is a vulnerable but optimistic ode to predicting a relationship is over before you or your partner are willing to admit it. Despite their breezy, confident nature; the contexts of Big Joanie’s songs are powerful because the relay the struggles of everyday – whether that’s having your mind turned to mush by a boring job, falling out with yourself, or others around you. They’re three women of colour talking about their life experiences to the backdrop of marching beats and punk-inspired riffs – and that’s something the world needs plenty more of in our opinion.

Order your copy of Sistahs here. Follow Big Joanie on Facebook for more updates.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut