Track Of The Day: Husk – ‘Crush’

Having been named as one of Gaydio’s ‘One To Watch’ and with support from the likes of BBC 6Music, Manchester based queer artist HUSK has been one of our faves here at GIHE for a while now, and so we couldn’t be happier to share their uplifting new single.

A catchy, danceable ‘tranthem’ of self-love, ‘Crush‘ is a call to go against society’s expectations and love yourself. Propelled by vibrant beats and a colourful, ’80s-reminiscent groove, it’s a glistening offering oozing all the uplifting vibes and shimmering energy needed to dance together in unity.

Of the track, HUSK explains:

“As a trans person, and I think literally every other person in society, especially marginalised groups, we’re taught to hate our bodies, and I was like, f*ck that! ‘Crush’ is 3 minutes where I have full permission to confess my love for my trans body, and I want others to love themselves too!

Yet again, HUSK has managed uplift our spirits and energise our souls with another euphoric pop hit.

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Mari Lane
@marimindles



PREVIEW: Sounds Queer: Rehearsing Utopia – An All Night Music Queertopia

Ahead of its second event this Saturday 17th September at Rich Mix, Ellie of Sounds Queer has told us about all they stand for and what to expect from the event. Have a read, and join in the fun tomorrow!

Sounds Queer is an innovative live music showcase spanning genre, expression and identity. The event will champion diverse voices and sounds from the LGBTQIA+ community, whilst providing a safe space for audiences within it.

Despite London being a cultural hub for both music and the queer community, there are few live music nights whose priority it is to provide a platform for LGBTQIA+ artists. In addition to this, there is a lack of truly inclusive events, gigs or venues for emerging music that caters to the specific needs of the community. Run by music lovers and queer creators, we aim to provide a platform for those artists as well as a safe space for the community to discover and support them.

For our next event, we are excited to announce we have partnered with the wonderful team at Rich Mix for a show called Rehearsing Utopia – An All Night Music Queertopia, this Saturday, 17th September 2022! 

A night dedicated to the celebration of queer live music, Queertopia is about giving a much-needed space for the creation of a queer live music utopia where audiences and performers alike, from the LGBTQIA+ spectrum, can enjoy, celebrate and connect around queer music and creativity. We will be launching our new season with an all night music extravaganza with the one and only Nimmo announced to be headlining.

The evening will be hosted by London’s undeniably talented and multi-faceted drag queen Barbs, who will also be giving us an extra special solo performance ahead of Nimmo’s set. Also supporting will be Amaroun (a GIHE fave!); a triple threat multi-instrumentalist, producer and songwriter with warm silk-like vocals that make kaleidoscopic alt-r&b. Our very own co-founder Toby Corton will also be supporting; a “charismatic queer cockney creative” who describes his sound as “a modern British take on neo-soul built on a foundation of frank queer storytelling”. We will also have the unreal DJs Bestley and D’vey taking us into the early hours with their wonderfully woozy soundscapes.

We are so incredibly proud of how far we’ve come since our first event in March and we are so excited about what’s to come. Watch this queer space!

It sounds right up our street! Nab your tickets here and check out an awesome playlist featuring the artists who’ll be gracing the stage tomorrow here.

Five Favourites: Jemima Coulter

Whilst you may know them from being one half of Hailaiker, or from their collaborations with the likes of Squirrel Flower and Novo Amor, Bristol-based artist Jemima Coulter has now released their debut solo album. Reflecting on themes such as unrequited love and chasing happiness – through both their own lived experiences and imagined situations – Grace After A Party is a beautifully poignant collection. Flowing with a shimmering, folk-strewn musicality, each track showcases Coulter’s raw, heartfelt vocals and ability to create stirring, emotion-rich dreamscapes with a swirling, immersive allure.

We think one of the best ways to get to know an artist is by asking what music inspires them. So, to celebrate the release of their debut album, we caught up with Jemima Coulter to ask about the music that has inspired them the most. See below for their choices of their five favourite albums, and be sure to treat your ears to Grace After A Party as soon as possible

Sufjan Stevens – Carrie & Lowell
I drew a lot from this album while writing Grace, mostly in thinking about storytelling and the details in the lyrics that make it compelling. The stories told in this album combined with the nuanced melodies makes it feel so directed, so itself and also perfectly balanced – never too much going on. Each section in a song sits perfectly on its own and in context of other sections, each song on the album sitting perfectly on its own and also tied to the others. I think the use of space in this album is not something I’ve found anywhere else; I don’t know what they used for the reverb, but listening to it, it’s all really ‘verby, but in a way where it’s like this special Carrie & Lowell room that’s a specific kind of dark and echoey but doesn’t make everything sound floaty and washed, and also ties the closer sounding guitar with everything else. Maybe it’s just the best mix I’ve ever heard ha. I listened to Carrie & Lowell a lot when I was driving, around the age of 19-20 – the combination of night-driving and this music seemed to swirl into an endless road. I’ve always wanted to recreate that in an album – you put it on and you’re there, it’s like a physical space, each song a room in a house, and the same things are in the rooms each time you listen but you’re still picking each of them up and turning them over in your hands and each object conjures an emotion in you.

Camille – Le Fil
Someone showed me ‘Quand Je Marche’ one morning and it was in my head for literally years until I found it on this album. There was a period while I was working on Grace (I think autumn 2020) – I was missing someone and I couldn’t sleep and I walked the perimeter of Bristol a few nights for nearly four hours each time and I remember walking the side of a steep A-road listening to this. I think she does nearly everything with her mouth? It’s really minimalist, but it taught me about using drones and melody and kind of inspired me to keep exploring that idea that you often just hear in folk. It’s also totally the opposite of what I tend to do with production and I love how her melodies totally carry the whole album. It has loads of repeating melodic themes and moments, almost like ‘acts’ and interludes which makes it theatrical, but in a really good way… It’s just a wicked album. 

Sea Oleena – Weaving a Basket 
I just think this is the most beautiful music I’ve ever heard. It makes time stand still. No other words. 

John Martyn – Glorious Fool 
I was shown this album fairly recently, after being aware of a few John Martyn songs. The bass in his music takes me somewhere – I don’t think I’ve heard anything like it. Sometimes it’s like it’s just John and that fretless bass and everything else is just highlighting whatever they’re doing. His music makes me think about timing and atmosphere more than anyone else’s at the moment. He’s not doing anything particularly dense with his melodies or his words, it’s all very felt and is almost improvisational. It seems that the songs are really recordings in the sense that they don’t feel concerned with how they’d stand-up as live performance, and that’s something I find about this particular album and in his other ones, that them being crafted in the studio in darkness and in the atmosphere absolutely comes through. I was reading Phill Brown’s autobiography Are we Still Rolling? and it includes a bit about them recording John Martyn’s One World album – they had speakers across a lake and recorded parts the other side of the water to create a massive outdoor reverb. The combination of nature and technology fits with the crossovers I hear in John Martyn’s music; he was clearly so ahead and on the brink of mixing jazz, folk and electronic experimentation. ‘Small Hours’ from that album is the best night-time song. 

The Blue Nile – Hats
The thing I love about this album is that it feels like film music because it is so secured within timbre limitations and concept limitations. It’s like an ’80s rework of the Casablanca soundtrack or something. It sounds so ’80s/early ’90s it’s almost like a modern day pastiche of that period of pop. Again though – maybe a theme going on here -, there’s so much space and anticipation in these songs which I’ve found really liberating, like “yes, repeat that bit 8 times”. The whole thing is a massive argument against concision for me – like, fuck being concise; be indulgent, do a fade out. There’s three songs on that album over six minutes, and it’s an absolute pleasure to be inside them for the whole six minutes, I want to be able to do that more than anything, really.

Massive thanks to Jemima Coulter for sharing their Five Favourites with us!

Grace After A Party, the debut album from Jemima Coulter, is out now via Hand In Hive.

Photo Credit: Christina Russell

Track Of The Day: adults – ‘things we achieve’

Following the release of their debut EP The Weekend Was Always Almost Over back in 2018, and the split Space Armadillo EP with fellow GIHE faves Bitch Hunt in 2020, South London band adults have announced that their debut album will be released in October. And now, following recent single ‘all we’ve got // all we need’, they’ve shared another brand new offering.

Propelled by their trademark jangling melodies and buoyant scuzzy energy, ‘things we achieve‘ reflects on the pressures of living in a Capitalist society as honey-sweet vocals interweave between whirring hooks. Showcasing adults’ ability to juxtapose poignant subject matter with an irresistibly blissful, catchy musicality, this latest single offers a slice of gloriously fizzing indie-pop that’ll both uplift and inspire. I just can’t get enough of adults’ fuzzy, frenetic drive, with shades of the joyous, danceable allure of Los Campesinos, and eagerly await the full album release…

Of the track, the band explain:

“(the song’s about) how capitalism makes us forget what matters, how to be kind to people and to enjoy living…”

for everything, always, the upcoming debut album from adults, is out in October via Fika Recordings.

Mari Lane
@marimindles