PLAYLIST: January 2019

We’re two weeks in to 2019 and whether you’re keeping up with ‘Dry January’, demolishing the leftover Christmas supplies, or simply carrying on like the trooper you are – we’ve put together a list of brand new music to help with all of the above. Take some time to scroll through our words and hit play on the Spotify link at the bottom of the page…

Big Joanie – ‘New Year’
Recorded at Hermitage Works with Producer Margo Broom and released via The Daydream Library Series (Thurston Moore & Eva Prinz’s label), Big Joanie’s debut album Sistahs is a stellar release from a band who have been actively working on and off-stage within London’s DIY scene for years. ‘New Year’ is the opening track on the record, and I love its focused, quiet yearning to kick-start something. (Kate Crudgington)

Lizzo – Juice 
Another utterly empowering and ferociously fun offering from GIHE favourite Lizzo, ‘Juice’ is filled with all the refreshing wit and funk-filled grooves that we’ve come to know and love from the Minneapolis artist. With Lizzo’s joyous, body-positive spirit and its immensely infectious, ’80s reminiscent hooks, ‘Juice’ is the ultimate feel-good anthem that you need to start your 2019. (Mari Lane)

The Choppy Bumpy Peaches – ‘Darjeeling’
What a musical delight from Luxembourg based The Choppy Bumpy Peaches. ‘Darjeeling”s mesmerising cacophony of instruments and sound, layering gently over each other, all drawn together with Julia Lam’s intriguing vocals. Such a heady and hypnotising sound. This track is taken from their first LP Sgt. Konfuzius & the Flowers of Venus which is out now, go check them out, The Choppy Bumpy Peaches. What a name. (Tash Walker)

Medejin – ‘Untitled 4’
There’s something about Medejin’s music which makes feel completely immersed in their sound, as if I’m in a room with no doors, covered ceiling to floor with speakers pouring out ‘Untitled 4’. A truly immersive dreamwave project from Jenn Taranto & Matthew Cooke. ‘Untitled 4’ is taken from their debut EP Eleni which is out now. I’ve got all my fingers crossed that Medejin will be bringing their Seattle sound to our shores in person soon. (TW)

Foxgluvv – ‘Crush’ (remixed by MOONOVERSUN)
Foxgluvv joined us in the studio as our first guest on the Get In Her Ears’ Radio Show this year, we talked with her about being a DIY artist, her particular slice of ‘hungover pop’ and this remix by Brighton based pop duo MOONOVERSUN. Released near the end of 2018, I cannot get enough of this remix and I urge you all to press play right now. It’s heavy on the electronics, pounding beats and warped vocals – dreamy. (TW)

Kill J – ‘Dead Weight Soldier’
Copenhagen’s Kill J has returned with a revenge fantasy in the form of new single ‘Dead Weight Soldier’. Following her fiercely political release ‘Strange Fruits of The Sea’ in 2018, this is the second track from her forthcoming album Superposition, which is set to be a poignant and unapologetic listen. (KC)

Cheerbleederz – ‘Staying Up Late’
Taken from last year’s EP Faceplant, Cheerbleederz’s latest single ‘Staying Up Late’ is filled with all the twinkling indie-pop melodies and honey-sweet vocals you could ever desire. With its jangly catchy hooks and a fuzzy whirring energy, it fills me with a comforting sense of joy on each listen. It’s also accompanied by a wonderfully animated, and super cute video, which you can watch here(ML)

Argonaut – ‘Girl Talk’
An empowering, punk-pop anthem, with motivational lyrics such as “You rock, you can change the world, you inspire boys and girls, you can do anything!”, Argonaut’s ‘Girl Talk’ is the perfect pick-me-up to kick start the new year. Filled with shimmering hooks and a magnificent punk-rock spirit, it’ll leave you ready to face 2019 with all the immense, buoyant energy that it oozes. As well as getting hold of their brilliant latest EP
The New Argonaut EP, you should also make sure you catch this band live – they completely blew us away playing at our gig at The Finsbury last week! (ML)

Panic Pocket – ‘Mr Big’
Inspired by too many formative Sex And The City marathons, Panic Pocket’s ‘Mr Big’ is an uplifting ditty about desperately wanting your close friend to stop defining herself by her relationship status and focus instead on friendship. Flowing with a twinkling charm and the London duo’s impeccable tongue-in-cheek wit, the track oozes honey-sweet harmonies alongside shimmering melodies and a gritty synth-driven energy. Strewn with memorable SATC quotes, highlighting the importance of friendship, it’s another luscious (and super relatable!) slice of indie-pop. (ML)

Micropixie – ‘New Year’s Day’
Micropixie is a British artist based in San Francisco who has recently found herself on The New York Times Top 10 Playlist for new songs which is amazing. We love this track from Micropixie which moves to its own beat whilst taking “a high-concept approach to offering commentary on a world that is torn by injustice, violence and war, and financial misdoings.” From all of us here at Get In Her Ears a huge well done to Micropixie, she’s definitely someone to watch out for in 2019. (TW)

Tallies – ‘Easy Enough’
Taken from their new self-titled debut album, Tallies’ latest single ‘Easy Enough’ oozes a captivating, dreamy haze as the raw vocals of Sarah Cogan soar alongside a whirring scuzz. With its shoegazey spiralling hooks and luscious emotion-driven energy, it’s impossible not to get sucked into its hypnotic allure and fall instantly in love with the unique, swirling  charm of this Toronto-based band. (ML)

Amaal – ‘Not What I Thought’
I’ve been enjoying this song a lot since I first heard it just over a week ago. ‘Not What I Thought’ comes from Somali-Canadian artist Amaal Nuux who has returned to music following much time spent on her activist work as the Goodwill Ambassador for Somalia Women and Children. Drawing influences from both her personal life experiences and her travels in all her work and music, this is her latest single out released on 10th January. Strong beats, warped samples and emotionally evocative vocals ‘Not What I Thought’ by Amaal earns a firm place on our January 2019 playlist. (TW)

Beckie Margaret – ‘New York’
My absolute favourite! Beckie Margaret released this heart-breaking track at the end of last year, and I’ve not been able to stop listening to it since. Beckie’s resilience in the face of heartbreak is what makes listening to her music so rewarding. Even in her seemingly weakest moments, her powerful, pure vocals provide an aching relief that can be felt all the way from the end of Southend Pier in her hometown, to the lonely shores of the city she sings about. (KC)

David Bowie – ‘Lady Grinning Soul’
It’s been two years since the death of the legendary David Bowie, and whilst it’s easy to lament the gap he’s left in the musical world, it’s much easier to put on his records and celebrate all of the wonderful art he left behind. ‘Lady Grinning Soul’ is taken from Aladdin Sane, one of my favourite Bowie albums. I’ll certainly be spinning it in tribute to the Starman over the next few weeks. (KC)

Live Highlights of 2018

Despite being a pretty scary year in the grand scheme of things, 2018 has actually been exceptionally great for new music. And seeing live music has, as ever, provided a necessary catharsis and enjoyment; forever giving us something to look forward to. 

Having witnessed an uncountable amount of women/non binary folk being awesome on stage this year, it was hard to pick out our highlights … But, from some of our DIY faves, to Fever Ray and Courtney Barnett (and – yes – Indietracks Festival features twice, it’s that great), here are a few events that stood out as particularly special for us… 

Witch Fever Live @ The Finsbury, January:
2018 has been of year of many incredible gigs, not least our own gigs that we’ve been lucky enough to host at The Finsbury. And, whilst I have a massive amount of love and pride in all the gigs we’ve hosted, the year kicked off with a pretty immense one. Manchester’s Witch Fever, who made two six hour coach journeys to be with us, treated us to their frenzied, raucous offerings with an incredible, un-matched power. As front woman Amy’s incredible, snarling energy stole the show, we were all left completely in awe of this band’s formidable intensity. And they weren’t the only amazing band of the night; joining them was the empowering force of The Nyx, the grunge-fuelled energy of ARXX and the gorgeous pop-punk of Militant Girlfriend.
(Mari Lane – Managing Editor/Co-Founder)

Fever Ray @ The Troxy, March:
Fever Ray’s fierce, focused, sold out performance at the Troxy proved she’s an inimitable talent with a vision, generosity, and energy unlike any other. In Fever Ray’s space, no-one is an outsider: everyone is welcome in her warped and wonderful world. Emerging from the lights in her trademark “I heart Swedish girls” t-shirt and bare scalp, from start to finish the sound was flawless. Each lyric, synth sequence and drum beat was more distinct and discernible than the next – if you weren’t there, you definitely missed out.
(Kate Crudgington – Features Editor/Co-Founder)

Petrol Girls @ Shacklewell Arms, April:
Mari and I were so excited to see the brilliant Petrol Girls live for the first time this year, and they did not disappoint. Loud, lethal and life-affirming: their headline show was a raw, frenzied, furious affair. The band packed out the venue with the help of their friends Pretty Pistol and Screaming Toenail (our new favourite band), and played our favourite track ‘Touch Me Again’ with all the ferocity and energy we’d come to expect from this brilliant band of activists.
(Kate Crudgington)

Indian Queens @  Robert Smith’s Meltdown Festival, June:
Hackney trio Indian Queens performed to a packed out Purcell Room at The Southbank Centre this year, after being hand-picked by The Cure’s Robert Smith to play his (exceptionally well curated) 2018 Meltdown Festival. The band delivered a mesmeric, sharply executed performance that ended in a well deserved standing ovation. I felt like I’d witnessed something truly special from the Cool Thing Record signees when I left the building, and I look forward to catching them again in 2019.
(Kate Crudgington)

Indietracks Festival (and its sense of community), July:
There is the smell of long past years in the carriage as the rails clackity-clack below you, the signalman waves from the box as you pass, and behind the sidings crammed with moss-windowed rolling stock the natural amphitheatre of the main stage hoves into view.

Indietracks is hidden away but for those in the know its not just the boutique festival quietly winning at line-ups, its home. Not only welcoming and familiar, but full of friendship and love. The diversity of the billing, the cute touches and culture-clash between trains and music will delight newcomers but the community sustained between years – by the festival and railway volunteers, each band, every festival-goer – is something to be really astounded by. At a time when togetherness feels more elusive, but is ever more vital, Indietracks should be both celebrated and cherished for the community its nurtured and welcomes home each summer.
(Sarah Lay – Contributor)

Indietracks Festival (and the diversity of its line-up), July:
With our ongoing disappointment at the lack of diversity on the majority of mainstream festival line-ups this year, I was particularly excited to discover Indietracks – one that refreshingly, consistently, champions DIY bands and artists of all genders and genres. And, I wasn’t to be disappointed; the weekend – set in the idyllic Midland Railway Centre near Ripley in Derbyshire – exceeded all expectations.

Ask me about any of my favourite bands of 2018, and they were probably playing at Indietracks Festival. From an array of glorious indie-pop (Wolf Girl, Colour Me Wednesday, Happy Accidents, Worst Place), Feminist punk (Dream Nails, The Baby Seals, Dream Wife) and all the scuzzy, dreamy sounds in-between (Ghum, Sink Ya Teeth, Sacred Paws, Girl Ray), every single band I saw filled me with an empowering sense of joy and blissful gratitude. And I think all those I saw consisted of female identifying/non binary artists.

So, whilst it still seems to be unusual to attend bigger festivals these days and not encounter ingrained misogyny or disrespect of some kind, Indietracks felt like a different world; a safe, joy-filled world, and one jam-packed with all the best music (plus owls and parrots!).
(Mari Lane)

Qween Kwong @ Rough Trade East, July:
I remember this gig for several reasons. Firstly, because I arrived soaked in sweat and rain from the downpour that briefly broke the overwhelming summer heatwave, and secondly because I was lucky enough to interview Queen Kwong before her set. She was just as cool (and as cutting) as I’d imagined her to be, and her live performance was a visceral, loud, defiant example of her songwriting talent.
(Kate Crudgington)

Wendy Rae Fowler @ The Finsbury, September:
I won’t lie; prior to Wendy Rae Fowler headlining for us at The Finsbury this September I was overwhelmingly excited and a little nervous. I’ve been a huge fan of her work over the years, and to have her play for us stands out for me as a particularly special moment (or 45 minutes) of 2018. Immediately creating a captivating, cinematic atmosphere, she filled the room with a majestic sense of wonder, delivering a soul-grabbing, breath-taking set that I’m truly honoured to have hosted.
(Mari Lane)

Courtney Barnett Live In Berlin, November:
Touring her second album, Tell Me How You Really Feel, Courtney Barnett was a sight to behold this year: quite literally. I looked on with envy when the Deal sisters provided backing vocals for ‘Nameless, Faceless’ at the BBC’s Biggest Weekend Festival. But, fortunately, a trip to Berlin also included seeing Courtney live at the city’s Huxleys Neue Welt venue. Seeing the songs played on a larger scale, contrasting with the more laidback atmosphere of songs taken from her debut and early EPs highlighted Barnett’s brilliance and renewed my appreciation of her songwriting.
(John McGovern – Contributor)

 

 

 

GUEST BLOG: Grapefruit

In a new guest blog feature, Angela from Maidstone-based, alternative band Grapefruit writes about what it means to take claim of being women in the music industry.

Sometimes I have mixed feelings about describing Grapefruit as a “female fronted band”. As someone who thinks of gender as a needless and suffocating concept, it can feel like we’re highlighting something irrelevant.

But, we can’t escape the fact that the music we create is intrinsically tied to and is product of our identities. And when that identity is female or femme or non-binary, I do think it’s important to highlight in an industry that continues to be dominated by cis-male identities.

You might not be fazed that our band is female-fronted but some young girl interested in the music magazines in the men’s section of the newsagents might be. Growing up I certainly clung to female-fronted bands; Florence Welch of Florence and the Machine was an idol; my girlfriend and our lead guitarist first picked up a guitar and spent hours learning and mastering it so she could play music like Kate Nash, PJ Harvey and Siouxsie Sioux did.

The point is that whilst inspiring female talent certainly exists in the industry, we’re still often the only female-featuring band on the setlist. We still have to assure some sound engineers that we know how to set up our own mic-stands, and have had to shrug it off when they make sex jokes whilst we’re focusing on getting the levels right. We still look at each other confused when we are compared to a bunch of (talented) bands we sound nothing alike except for that rare female voice.

Until it’s not so rare to see a woman in a band at your local pub, we’ll continue to proudly announce our female-ness and to get excited when we get to play alongside other female, femme, and non-binary musicians. It is our responsibility to make ourselves a space and to fill it to the point of overflow; your ownership of your identity and musical mastery is an important “fuck-you” to the “music has gotten too girly” types (thanks for the words of wisdom, Bono).

 

A massive thank you to Grapefruit for this piece. Follow the band on Facebook for more updates.

Track Of The Day: The Motion – ‘Hollow’

Born and raised on the Isle Of Wight, Penny Churchill – aka The Motion – now creates their unique, emotionally driven alt-pop in South London, having studied at Goldsmiths and decided to stay in the area, drawn to its rich culture and like-minded people. A non-binary, genderqueer project, The Motion recently debuted their live show at The Gladstone Arms, before being a wonderful guest on our very own show on Hoxton Radio, and charming us all live at The Finsbury.

Now, The Motion has finally shared their dreamy debut single. Exploring post-breakup feelings and sensibilities, ‘Hollow’ flows with a shimmering soundscape as Penny’s rich, sumptuous vocals soar. Amongst swirling layers of instrumentation, an emotion-strewn haze builds to a powerful swell of glitchy whirring hooks, creating a colourful slice of psychedelic electro-pop. Combined with a raw, heartfelt lyricism, Churchill treats our ears to a glistening fusion sounds, showcasing their unique songwriting talent, marking themselves out as a definite one to watch.

Of the track, Penny expands: “‘Hollow’ is a song about exploring the mind set and feelings of space and emptiness surrounding a break up. The lyrics flip between narrating and then being in the moment, kind of like zooming in on specific moments and unpacking them.

Watch the brand new lyric video for ‘Hollow’ here:

Catch The Motion live at the following dates:

5th January: The Water Rats with Dead or Alive, London
5th February: The Finsbury Pub with Stop Look Listen, London

Mari Lane
@marimindles