Get In Her Ears Live @ Sebright Arms w/ Breakup Haircut, 17.11.2022

Following our super special September gig with Jemma Freeman and the Cosmic Something headlining, our November instalment of GIHE live saw us return to the Sebright Arms in Bethnal Green for a night filled with the best music, best people and best vibes. Massive thanks to Breakup Haircut, Piney Gir and BCOS RSNS, and to everyone who came down to support the bands and help us raise money for completely vital organisation, Mermaids.

First up, exciting new band BCOS RSNS treat us to their scuzzy garage-rock offerings, reflecting on themes ranging from people being dicks and internet crushes, to being yourself in a patriarchal society.


Next up, Piney Gir delivers her magical indie-pop dreamscapes with a swirling psychedelic haze and sunny, lilting energy. Oozing a majestic witchy allure, she completely immerses the crowd in her sparkling, uplifting majesty.


Back to headline for us after supporting Fräulein in January, Breakup Haircut treat us to 45 minutes of their joyous, tongue-in-cheek brand of pop-punk. Exuding a vibrant energy, they deliver their fizzing, danceable offerings with an infectious wit and colourful charisma. As I sing along to every word, I know for sure that I’m in the presence of a band on the rise.

Massive thanks to the three bands who played for us on Thursday! We’ll be back next month for not one, but two, special gigs! On 1st December we’ll be at Shacklewell Arms hosting Currls‘ EP launch with support from Collars and Hypsoline – tickets here. And on 9th December we’ll be back at the Shacklewell Arms again with Bad Sidekick and support from Alien Chicks and Cosmic Ninja – tickets here.

Words: Mari Lane / @marimindles
Photos: Don Blandford / @snapperchap.don

Get In Her Ears Live @ The Victoria, 14.10.22

Following September’s gig at The Shacklewell Arms with the driving ethereal soundscapes of Gemma Cullingford, our October installment of GIHE live saw us return to The Victoria in Dalston for what felt like a super special night filled with the best music, best people and best vibes. Massive thanks to Jemma Freeman and the Cosmic Something, KIN and Trouble Wanted, and to everyone who came down to pack out the venue and helped make it a night to remember.

Here, Mandy Bang writes a few words about the night to accompany Jon Mo’s fantastic pics…

It’s Friday night and The Victoria is packed – a glass smashes on the dancefloor and is carefully kicked aside by revellers determined to have a good time. Tonight’s opening band conjure a murky dive bar on the wrong side of the tracks: the saloon doors unexpectedly swing open, everyone turns to look up at the new arrivals, jaws drop, gasps are audible… there’s a new stranger in town – Trouble Wanted.

The London-based five-piece have just one song available on their Bandcamp page, but, when it’s the “sexy, queer exchange between Lonely Cowgirl and a mysterious dyke trucker”, it’s one hell of a special treat. Live, Trouble Wanted blend menacing basslines, dreamy guitar touches, dancing drums, sexy synths and the occasional burst of alluring saxophone with semi-spoken vocals. Lucy sings of unrequited lust and dysfunctional mother/child relationships and pistol-whips songs with loaded humour. By the end of their set they have encouraged the whole room to shake off their inhibitions as we all sing “I want you in my bed” with wild abandon!

Tonight is Ritu Arya’s last gig with KIN, who played their second ever show for GIHE back in 2019. The band dedicate the drummer’s favourite song to her and later in their set proceed to initiate their first crowd sing-along during a cover of Wheatus’ ‘Teenage Dirtbag’.

The release of the trio’s new single, ‘Soapdish’, coincides with tonight’s gig and is a melancholy ramble through a relationship that is better to be left behind, as singer/keyboardist Grace asserts, “I’m not going to change my mind”. In amongst KIN’s atmospheric indie pop, there are sparse guitar echoes which momentarily bring to mind unexpected eerie Bauhaus vibes. Meanwhile, their 2020 single, ‘L.O.V.E.’, possesses the kind of upbeat energy that demands to drive us to sunny days spent dancing on a beach somewhere far out of reach.

Our final act of the night is Jemma Freeman and The Cosmic Something and Jemma’s party look this evening is demonic jester with a touch of Jaz Coleman of Killing Joke fame. The trio put on a frantic display of musicianship with psychedelic and garage rock leanings, skipping from one catchy song into the next which throws the audience into an array of shapes.

“I don’t know what I’m supposed to know”, declares Jemma before shredding so enthusiastically a guitar string breaks. Jemma conducts the quickest string change ever carried out by a musician mid-set, whilst the bassist and drummer keep an impressive backbeat flowing. One gets the impression that this rhythm section could quite happily lay down a two-hour instrumental jam as if performing at a ’70s music festival. Jemma, seemingly impressed by said bandmates’ calm professionalism, exclaims, “I don’t really need to be here“.

Jemma’s in-between song banter hints at a vulnerable front person with an awkward confidence. Lyrics are laced with self-deprecating humour and a composition from the band’s upcoming new album, ‘Miffed’, is a tale of a bad Tinder date that involved getting locked in a park – “Sounds exciting, but it’s not good”, they assure us before dedicating ‘Lump’ to “weird and petty gay people – like me!”.

Rather than the rallying ‘girls to the front’ mantra, Jemma encourages each audience member to look behind them and to move aside if those behind are struggling to see the band bathed in orange, green and blue lighting. I’ve only ever been at one other gig where the band has been this wonderfully thoughtful (namely Dream Wife) and Jemma half-jokes that it took ten years of therapy to ascertain: “I’m five-foot two-inches tall and I’m going to take up space and be unafraid“. A sentiment that gets a huge cheer from this crowd.

Big thanks to all three of the incredibly fantastic bands on Friday night! As for us, our next gig will be at the Sebright Arms next month with a lush line-up of Breakup Haircut, Piney Gir and BCOS RSNS on 17th November. Tickets can be nabbed over on Dice and we’ll see you down the front!

Words: Mandy Bang / @mandybang
Photos: Jon Mo / @jonmophotography

PLAYLIST: Transgender Awareness Week 2021

At Get In Her Ears, we stand every day with our transgender and gender non-conforming siblings. We support trans and non-binary artists because they create some of our favourite music, and because trans rights are human rights and we send our love, solidarity and joy to all the trans community today, and every day.

This week has been Transgender Awareness Week, and ends with Transgender Day of Remembrance tomorrow 20th November, so today we wanted to uplift and spread awareness of just some of the incredible transgender and non-binary artists who we love to blast out of our speakers on a regular basis. Read about our choices below, and take a listen to the full playlist here.

If you need support during Transgender Awareness Week, or at anytime in the future, you can always reach out to Switchboard LGBT+ via their website or by calling 0330 330 0630.

 

Jackie Shane – ‘Comin’ Down’
As always, I can’t resist adding soul singer Jackie Shane to our playlists. Her wonderfully smooth vocals, sophisticated style and defiance in the face of transphobia in the early ’60s all make her a true GIHE icon. (Kate Crudgington)

Ms White – ‘Fuck Men’
I’m ashamed to say that I hadn’t heard of Ms White until this year, when Belfast artist F.R.U.I.T.Y thankfully introduced me to her by including this track in their recent Five Favourites feature for us. A wonderfully empowering anthem from the trans artist and for people of all genders; I challenge you to listen to this and not feel motivated and ready to face the world. (Mari Lane)

Thigh High – ‘Go Slow
I had the pleasure of interviewing Thigh High last year and I recommend you check out their full back catalogue – a band truly dedicated to celebrating and centring queer and trans joy in their music! (Tash Walker)

Ezra Furman – ‘I Wanna Be Your Girlfriend’
Having come out as a transgender woman earlier this year, and sharing beautiful images of herself with her child, Ezra Furman has long been a favourite of mine, since I first fell in love with her 2018 album Transangelic Exodus. This song, taken from 2019’s Twelve Nudes, is a beautiful reflection on identity, as Furman describes it – “a romantic song of transgender longing…(ML)

The Crystal Furs – ‘Miss Hughes’
Portland band The Crystal Furs returned to our ears earlier this year with own unique brand of queer jangle pop. Tying together the band’s penchant for writing about cities with vintage b-movie vibes, ‘Miss Hughes’ is a playfully twinkling offering, complete with organ melodies and honey-sweet vocals. (ML)

Bitch Hunt – ‘Shapeshifter’
GIHE faves Bitch Hunt originally formed at the amazing First Timers fest, and this year released their debut EP via Reckless Yes. The title track of the EP, ‘Shapeshifter’ is a stirring slice of effervescent punk-pop, reflecting on themes of transition and gender identity, and how we are consistently ‘shape-shifting’ depending on our circumstances. A beautifully poignant offering, oozing a sparkling sense of optimism. (ML)

Chuck SJ – ‘Sink Your Teeth In’
This single is taken from DIY multi-instrumentalist Chuck SJ’s upcoming debut album Resist.Recharge.Revolt. Full of atmospheric guitar riffs, sparse beats and glitchy electronics, it’s an industrial-tinged rumination on the forces that construct, influence and sometimes dismantle our ways of thinking. Chuck is also one half of punk duo Byenary who you can check out here. (KC)

Adult Mom – ‘Berlin’
Consistently my most listened-to artist over the last couple of years, non-binary musician Stevie Knipe – aka Adult Mom – creates the most beautifully heartfelt music. I’m sending extra love to them at the moment as they were diagnosed with breast cancer earlier this year and are currently in recovery. I can’t wait to hear more gorgeous music from them when they’re ready. (ML)

Smoothboi Ezra.- ‘My Own Person
We’re big fans at Get In Her Ears of non-binary Irish artist Smoothboi Ezra, whose music so often touches on the melancholy but with such richness it is such a pleasure to listen to their music which is often SO relatable to all of us in the queer community. (TW)

YAY MARIA – ‘Template’ (feat. FRANX)
Having previously captivated our ears as the front person of Grawl!x, trans artist YAY MARIA recently released her wonderful debut solo album, OYEZ. Made in collaboration with Nottingham-based queer artist and musician FRANX, ‘Template’ is filled with a stirring lyricism that celebrates self-love, whilst oozing a dry wit, drawing attention with a raw honesty to the mundane issues of modern life; the parts of life that are often expected of us – the ‘template’ we are expected to live by – but by no means are appropriate or desired by all, particularly those in the queer/non-heteronormative community. (ML)

PET Wife – ‘B.L.O.O.D.O.R.A.N.G.E.’
Love what I’ve heard from PET wife so far! I came across them only a couple of weeks ago. PET wife are a trans/non-binary couple and art-pop duo from Bushwick, Brooklyn. This single is accompanied by a music video, that they describe as an homage to the vampire lesbian exploitation films of the 1970s, with an all-trans/gender non-conforming crew and queer cast. (TW)

Catherine Moan – ‘Fools’ (Depeche Mode Cover)
This is a fun, polished cover of a Depeche Mode b-side from Philadelphia-based electro-pop artist Catherine Moan. Her buoyant electronics and infectious rhythms give this slice of ’80s alternative music nostalgia a welcome sultry twist.
(KC)

SOPHIE – BIPP (Autechre MX) 
A pioneer in electronic music who we sadly lost earlier this year. Like so many of the people I have learned about in our British queer history, SOPHIE will live on in their music and the memories we all hold of how that music makes us feel. (TW)

Gordian Stimm – ‘Breath Diet’
I’m such a big fan of everything electronic artist & producer Gordian Stimm creates. This track is taken from their instrumental EP Flirty Lucre for Public Sector, which they released earlier this year. Their debut album, Your Body In On Itself (released by Amateur Pop Incorporated) also makes for a super listen. (KC)

LOTIC – ‘Burn A Print’
Berlin-based artist & producer LOTIC’s mission is to “live life to the fullest by not giving a fuck about what anybody thinks,” something she clearly and defiantly communicates on this track. With a name that means to “to inhabit rapidly moving water,” Lotic’s chaotic yet fluid soundscapes truly embody her passionate, fighting spirit. (KC)

HUSK – ‘My Innocence’
Manchester based trans, non-binary artist HUSK prides themselves on celebrating queer joy and equal rights in their shimmering, euphoric pop anthems. ‘My Innocence’ is the perfect accompaniment to having a dance with loved ones and uniting in the celebration of queer love and diversity. (ML)

F.R.U.I.T.Y – ‘U.P.S’
Belfast-based queer artist Dan O’Rawe – aka F.R.U.I.T.Y – released their debut EP earlier this year. Taken from the EP, ‘U.P.S’ offers a wonderfully quirky, futuristic soundscape whilst reflecting on themes of identity. As twinkling hooks flow with a cinematic splendour, it’s a glistening, uplifting slice of alt-electro-pop. (ML)

Arca – ‘KLK’ (feat. ROZALIA)
Arca is a trailblazing trans artist who has been pushing boundaries in the electronica scene for years now. I love her music, especially right now where I cannot quite scratch that live gig rave itch. Turn this up loud, close your eyes and dance dance dance, you’ll feel free. (TW)

Mavi Phoenix – ‘Boys Toys’
Mavi Phoenix is someone that we interviewed a couple of years back now, but who spoke so eloquently about equality and the importance of queer music in the world. Phoenix has found a home in their new sound and also in the pronoun “he”. This track is taken from their debut album of the same name, which was released earlier this year. This is all about Phoenix being reborn, which is what happens in the accompanying music video to this track. ‘Boys Toys’ is as important as an exploration for Phoenix’s gender identity as it is for his artistic work. And on top of all that, it’s an absolute tune. Enjoy. (TW)

Khx05 – ‘Trouble’
I have Nova Twins to thank for introducing me to North Carolina-based artist Khx05. They feature on the duo’s compilation album Voices For The Unheard, a blistering collection of alternative anthems that showcase the eclectic, tenacious range of talent from artists of colour in the heavy & alternative music scenes. Khx05 is one of the most interesting artists I’ve come across this year and I urge you to check them out. (KC)

Kae Tempest – ‘People’s Faces’
Coming out as non-binary last year, Kae Tempest is one of the most necessary and innovative artists around. The glaringly honest and completely relevant social commentary of ‘People’s Faces’ showcases their unique poetic skill at creating relevant and hugely emotive social narratives. But a subtle glimmer of hope also shines through; the comfort we gain from those we love, and the comfort we can offer them just by being there.(ML)

Shamir – ‘Cisgender’
I’ve been such a fan of Shamir for years and really admire how they’re constantly developing their sound and not shying away from being their true self. ‘Cisgender’ is a simply beautiful and moving reflection on their non-binary identity: “I’m not cisgender / I’m not binary trans / I don’t wanna be a girl / I don’t wanna be a man / I’m just existing on this god forsaken land.” Solidarity and love to you Shamir, always. (ML)

Track of The Day: The Crystal Furs – ‘Miss Hughes / Please Fade Away’

Having previously charmed our ears with their debut album Beautiful and True, Portland’s indie jangle pop band The Crystal Furs have spent their career channelling their growth as individuals and as a group into their music. Their sound reflects the shifting, unpredictable nature of life and deftly changes with each curveball thrown. Their two new tracks, ‘Miss Hughes’ and ‘Please Fade Away’ show that same keenness to embrace change and throw the full weight of their creativity behind their own growth.

Both songs are built on a foundation of The Crystal Furs’ ’60s-inspired pop sound, with high lilting vocals harmonising over a chirpy combination of strings and keyboard. This is complemented by a more contemporary-sounding reverb and deep bass, blending the old and new styles in a way that marry together to create something unique and exciting.

Miss Hughes’ opens with the rich boom of an organ, striking a decisive and powerful note that rumbles beneath the lighter vocals and strings as they jump in. You can feel the vintage influences soaking into the sound in the way the harmonies dance around each other, as the delightfully simple yet immersive riffs play around the chord progression. The reverb lends an almost club-like vibe to the track underlying the chirpy upbeat singing, which creates a fun contrast that sees the two styles balance each other out into a playful whole.

‘Please Fade Away’ is another wonderfully constructed song, playing off vocals teeming with attitude against that same bright ‘60s sound. The vocals are absolutely fantastic, with the relatable premise of wishing someone would stop being so clingy and just disappear. The snark comes through the wording in a way that is effectively juxtaposed against tones that are otherwise very gentle in their sound and rhythm. These seemingly simple structural decisions give the track’s details so much character. The delicate tambourine jingles feel almost sarcastic, so lightly played against the lyrics, given power by the throbbing drums and signature chirping guitars.

Both tracks show an evolution in The Crystal Furs’ sound. The way the more contemporary musical elements enhance the effect of the vintage style gives the songs a distinct and timeless flavour that feels at once familiar, yet novel. Two dreamily uplifting offerings that leave us longing for more of The Crystal Furs’ playfully honey-sweet creations.

Kirstie Summers
@ActuallyKurt

Artwork: Kara Buchanan