LISTEN: GIHE on Soho Radio with Charlotte Adigéry

Tash & Kate were back on the Soho Radio airwaves playing loads of new music from some of their favourite female, non-binary and LGBTQ+ artists. Sadly Mari couldn’t make it into the studio, but offered some of her “musical musings” too.

French-born, Belgian-Caribbean musician Charlotte Adigéry also joined them to talk about her debut album Topical Dancer, which she worked on with Bolis Pupul, and the power of joy and laughter when it comes to making art about your own life experiences. Baby Rocco also had his say!

Listen back below:

Tracklist
Eurythmics & Aretha Franklin – Sisters Are Doin’ It For Themselves
Adrianne Lenker – Symbol
Julia-Sophie – Dial Your Number
t l k – IWNU
Fraulein – Drag Behind
A.A. Williams – Melt
PET Wife – Alone
Ailsa Tully – Salt Glaze
Tomberlin – happy accident
ROBYN & Neneh Cherry ft. Mapei – Buffalo Stance
Pongo – Doudou
My Idea – Crutch
CMAT – Every Bottle Is My Boyfriend
After London – Here, Tonite
Charlotte Adigéry x Bolis Pupul – Ceci n’est pas un cliché
**Interview with Charlotte Adigéry**
Tirzah – Tectonic
Hannah Schneider – Mirror Sphere
Big Thief – Little Things
Muna Ileiwat – Stuck
Petrol Girls – Baby, I Had An Abortion
SASAMI & No Home – Squeeze
KIN – Cosmos
Amaroun – Brown Skin Beauty
Cate Le Bon – Remembering Me
Queen Latifah ft. Monie Love – Ladies First

INTERVIEW: The Music Federation launch their ‘Safe Space Policy’ for all live shows

London based music promoters The Music Federation have launched their new Safe Spaces Policy in response to the recent surge in cases of spiking that women across the UK have experienced within the live sector. In partnership with Strut Safe and Girls Against, TMF’s policy has a three-part structure providing guidance for post, during and after show an event, as well as guidance on what to do if attendees feel uncomfortable at a TMF show or if they witness harassment of any kind.

We caught up with Jasmine Hodge, Head of Promotions at TMF, to talk about implementing their new policy, how important it is to be proactive when it comes to harassment at gigs, and their anticipations for their charity gig with Lily Moore, Gracey & Sody, hosted by Abbie McCarthy on 31st Jan at Colours in Hoxton…

 

Let’s get a bit of background on you…how did you start working with The Music Federation and can you explain briefly what you do?

Jasmine: Myself, Sam Hong and Rebecca Sangs (who all co-created the safe space policy!) all work for The Music Federation. I am Head of Promotions and work across all our signed artists, festivals and partner labels helping promote them across all media platforms. Sam is our Head of Live and Rebecca is his live assistant, they are responsible for all our live shows and festivals. The Music Federation itself is a community of festivals, artists, labels and partners that launched about 6 months ago. We are building a group of likeminded people who want to be the change that the music industry needs. (You can read about us in Music Week here!)”

Our website is here.

You’ve just launched your new Safe Space Policy for TMF today. Can you explain what a Safe Space looks and feels like to you? And can you talk us through some of the key points of your policy?

Jasmine: I (and most women in the industry) have experienced some form of harassment at live shows/festivals, whether that be from industry professionals or just gig attendees. In the past, I have been too apprehensive to report this or take further action due to this being seen as the “industry standard”. Since working at TMF, I have never felt more confident in our senior management, partners, and wonderful live department to take any accusations seriously. This has filled me with hope that the industry is changing for the better. We want to make sure other people feel as confident as I do in reporting incidents and being listened to.

The music industry has swept sexual harassment under the carpet for too long. It’s not on anymore. For women in the industry, it’s harassment in the workplace. If this was an office space and a guy came up behind me and unclipped my bra, groped me, or asked me to get changed in front of them, there would be procedures in place to get him fired – all of those things mentioned have happened to me. Why does the music industry not have this? We need to have people ready to call this behaviour out, to actually ban these predators from future shows and to actively support the person who had this happen to them. We are building our new community and those people are not invited.

Some of our points in the policy include having a rep on site (of which we will advertise on social media prior to the event) who will be there to help with any accusation, requesting male and female security guards, partnering with Girls Against and Strut Safe etc. We are also looking into online reporting structures post-event for anyone who didn’t feel comfortable to say something at the time. We are aware that this policy will be forever evolving as times change, so we welcome all suggestions to improve. We are also having regular in-house meetings to discuss any suggestions made to us.

As you mentioned, you’ve launched this new policy in partnership with Strut Safe, Girls Against and The F-List – all great organisations we support here at GIHE. Talk us through how you connected with these platforms and what input they had into the policy…

Jasmine: We reached out to them in the first instance to get their opinions on our policy and wording. We wanted as many eyes on this as possible and are happy for this to develop in the public eye. These organisations do such amazing things, and their expertise is something we really wanted to use. We are also in talks with other amazing organisations such as The Music Assistant to be partners for our larger events, which we are really excited about!

There is the saying that “too many cooks spoil the broth”, but in this case, we want as many “cooks” as possible. This is a joint effort, and we want to work with those who are wanting change as much as we are.

TMF have also organised a charity gig with Lily Moore, Gracey & Sody, hosted by Abbie McCarthy in aid of Strut Safe on 31st Jan at Colours in Hoxton. Talk me through your anticipations for this event…

Sam: We are really hoping to promote our Safe Spaces Policy alongside raising awareness, raising money & supporting the important work that Strut Safe have done and continue to do. For anyone who doesn’t know, Strut Safe is a free, non-judgemental volunteer service dedicated to walking anyone who needs us home safely. To be able to add a charity aspect to this and help aid the safety of women in live music spaces is so vital to what we believe at TMF as well, so being involved in this show with such amazing musicians as well as our curator Abbie McCarthy is a great sign of positive change, and we hope to keep up that energy.

Finally, the work you’re doing with TMF and implementing your Safe Space Policy is vital, but it’s also a difficult thing to process and speak about. How have you found the process overall?

Jasmine: I understand that these are difficult conversations to have but honestly, I have not felt uncomfortable speaking to anyone at TMF about this. By changing the stigma that surrounds it and having open and honest discussions, it has been very rewarding and comforting to discuss this.

The most important element of this to me is having men who actually listen. I am very lucky to work with a company that not only has men who listen, but ones who are actively trying to support women (without being reminded). For example, I have curated a compilation album that is coming out in February which is entirely female, non-binary and LGBTQ+ artists to raise money for Reclaim These Streets. A company that allows you to spend your working hours curating that is pretty rad!

Thanks to Jasmine and The Music Federation for their time!

Read their full Safe Space Policy here.

Follow The Music Federation on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram

LISTEN: GIHE on Soho Radio with Shivani Dave & HyperTribe 17.11.21

Tash, Kate & Mari were back on the Soho Radio airwaves playing loads of new music from some of their favourite female, non-binary and LGBTQ+ artists.

The Log Books Co-Founder and all round icon Shivani Dave also spoke to fellow Log Books Co-Founder Tash about their podcast, how they make it and the importance of documenting LGBTQIA+ history. Tash also caught up with Kimi, the Founder & CEO of HyperTribe, to talk about the support and advice their platform gives to new and emerging artists.

Listen back below:

 

Tracklist
Fanny – Ain’t That Peculiar
Sink Ya Teeth – If You See Me
Baauer, Tirzah – Way From Me
SEA CHANGE – Night Eyes
Problem Patterns – Terfs Out
Dutch Mustard – A Song For Dreamers
Agender – No Nostalgia
Deep Tan – tamu’s yiffing refuge
Bad Idea – Crash
Notelle – Turnover Rate
Fana Hues – Pieces
**HyperTribe Interview with Kimi**
Belot – Harmless Fun
Queen Cult – A Song About Consent
Shamir – Cisgender
Gordian Stimm – Breath Diet
**Shivani/The Log Books Interview**
Ezra Furman – I Wanna Be Your Girlfriend
Greta Isaac – Polyfilla
Flowerkid – I Met The Devil At 4 Years Old
O Hell – Down
Lunar Vacation – Gears (GIHE)
LibraLibra – Candy Mountain
Heff VanSaint – Youth on Fire
Jackie Shane – Any Other Way

PREMIERE: SUSU – ‘Slow Death’

Breathing new life into a rock and roll classic, New York outfit SUSU have shared their new single ‘Slow Death’, a cover of the Flamin’ Groovies 1986 original track. Taken from their debut EP Panther City, which is set for release on 13th November, SUSU have put their own spin on the single with their powerful vocals and interweaving harmonies.

Formed of vocalists and songwriters Liza Colby and Kia Warren, SUSU want to provide listeners with a soundtrack to everyday America. “Whether you are on the bus or not, SUSU will always be USUS,” Colby & Warren explain, and this message of unity is underscored by the sounds of fellow band members Joey Wunsch (guitar), Ronnie Bruno (drums) and Connor McClelland (bass).

On ‘Slow Death’, SUSU have maintained the swirling psych-tinged guitar sounds of the Flamin’ Groovies’ original, with Colby & Warren’s vocals freshening up the classic track. “We aren’t shy about being black women in Rock and Roll. There is an aliveness, an awareness, and a spirituality to SUSU that are both timely and timeless,” Colby explains. That’s exactly what they captured on their previous single ‘Work Song‘ and once again on this latest release.

Watch the video for ‘Slow Death’ below.

Follow SUSU on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter & Spotify for more updates.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut