#ThrowbackThursday: GIHE w/ Petty Phase (15.03.18)

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and new lockdown in London, we’re unable to make it into the Hoxton Radio studio to broadcast our weekly live new music show from 7-9pm. Instead, we’re sharing previous GIHE radio show recordings as #ThrowbackThursday sessions, so you can still enjoy 2 hours of new music tunes & chats with some of our favourite artists each week.

Today, we’ve picked our March 2018 show with Essex-based Riot Grrrls Jen & Alyx from Petty Phase. Kate and Mari spoke to them about playing live for GIHE at our first ever Finsbury Pub gig, the unique “subtle anger” experienced in the queue for Wetherspoons, and the pair played stripped back versions of tracks ‘The Jesus Touch’ and ‘Chinese Whispers’

Listen back to the show here:

Tracklist
Chromatics – Girls Just Wanna Have Fun (Cyndi Lauper cover)
The Blow – After Party
Faber – Nasty Woman
Bella Barton – Reflections
Henry Green – Another Light
Abie Wade – Reasonable Doubt
Suzie Stapleton – Negative Prophet
GOUX – Over You
MORGAN – Hells Paradise
JAAYNS – Monitors
Rebecca Lou – Under The Moon
Post Louis – Little Jack
Petty Phase – You’ll Be Dead
**Interview & Live Session with Petty Phase**
Honey – Rapunzel
Glam Skanks – Bad Bitch
Smerz – No Harm
Pillow Queens – Favourite
Frankie Knight – Day By Day
Steele – Know Her
Odina – Nothing Makes Sense
Brooke Law – Hidden
Cosy Slippers – Not Hard To Say Goodbye
Tracy Chapman – Talkin’ ’bout a Revolution

LISTEN: Petrol Girls – ‘I Believe Them’ (Solidarity Not Silence)

A raucous anthem with a defiant and empowering message, Petrol Girls have shared their latest single ‘I Believe Them’. The uncompromising track has been released to raise funds for Solidarity Not Silence, who are a group of women fighting a claim of defamation made against them by a well-known musician. You can download ‘I Believe Them’ exclusively from bandcamp today to support their cause.

GIHE stands in solidarity with the women affected by the Solidarity Not Silence case. Read the powerful statement Ren from Petrol Girls has made about the track below, and scroll down to the end of this post to watch the accompanying video. #IBelieveThem

“We’re releasing this track to raise as much money as we possibly can for Solidarity Not Silence and to widen the network of people supporting the cause. Solidarity Not Silence is the legal defence fund for a group of women, including myself, who are being sued for defamation by a man in the music industry because of comments that we each made separately regarding his behaviour towards women. We’ve been fighting this case since December 2016 and desperately need help raising money for our legal costs. The only reason we’ve been able to successfully fight this case as long as we have is because we were able to come together and fundraise for our legal defence. Help us keep our legal representation all the way to court and win this!

“As one of the Solidarity Not Silence defendants, I’m limited in what I can say about the case whilst it’s ongoing. However, there’s nothing to stop me contributing to a wider conversation about sexual violence and the law – which is what this track, ‘I Believe Them’ is about.

“’How are we meant to protect ourselves?’ I find myself internally screaming this question, which is the chorus lyric, on a pretty regular basis. On the one hand, the criminal justice system consistently fails and often further traumatises survivors of sexual violence who decide to report to the police. This system clearly does not protect the majority of survivors and I personally do not believe it holds any answers in dealing with gender based violence. Then on the other hand, when survivors and their allies try to protect one another by speaking out about abusive behaviour, they become vulnerable to libel/ defamation law. And in both criminal and libel cases, the burden of truth is placed on the survivor. Literally what does the law expect us to do?

“There is, in practice, no legal aid available for the defence of a defamation case, which creates a dynamic whereby it is relatively easy for someone with money to silence those without. Money should not be a barrier to accessing justice and we refuse to allow our case to set a precedent for silencing marginalised voices in the music community and beyond. Please donate to/share our crowdfunder.”

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

#ThrowbackThursday: GIHE w/ The Tuts 16.03.17

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and Lockdown 2.0, we’re unable to make it in to the Hoxton Radio studio to broadcast our weekly live new music show from 7-9pm. Instead, we’re sharing previous show recordings as #ThrowbackThursday sessions, so you can still enjoy 2 hours of new music tunes & chats with some of our favourite artists each week.

Today, we’ve picked our March 2017 show with feminist pop-punk trio The Tuts (aka Nadia, Beverley and Harriet.) Tash, Mari & Kate spoke to them about power-cut troubles during their Glastonbury set, the struggles of being a DIY “three tone” band, their interactions with Kathleen Hanna from Bikini Kill, their love for Feeder and playing for Decolonise Fest’s fundraiser in 2017. They also performed two of their tracks live in the studio.

Listen back here:

Tracklist
Candi Staton – Young Hearts Run Free
Nina Jirachi – Pure Luck
Nipah – Forever
Malka – Fell For You
Little Wise ft. Sal Kimber – Favourite Song
Shopping – Wind Up
Luuna – Soap
Pip Blom – I Think I’m In Love
Vaarwell – You
DYVR – Half Awake
H1987 – I
Caswell – Animal
Molina – Salvation
The Baby Seals – Guuurl
The Selecter – Missing Words
**The Tuts Interview & Live Session**
Stormzy – Shut Up
Tilia – Black Monday
Innacut ft. Anqui – Feel Love
Petrol Girls – Touch Me Again
Bitch Falcon – Clutch
Xy&o – What’s Love Got To Do With It
Noga Erez – Toy
Adwaith – Hall
Barbara Lewis – Hello Stranger

LISTEN: Divide and Dissolve – ‘Denial’

An exhilarating, powerful soundscape that aims to erode the foundations of colonialism and liberate the land for black and indigenous communities, multidimensional duo Divide and Dissolve have shared their latest single ‘Denial’. Taken from their upcoming album Gas Lit, which is set for release on 29th January 2021 via Invada Records, the track is an eerie cacophony of thunderous riffs, ear-shattering percussion and uncanny saxophone notes that aim to eradicate white supremacy.

“Sometimes we don’t need to talk in order for others to understand what’s going on,” the duo explain about their intense instrumentals. “We are communicating with our ancestors through the music. Our ancestors help us to communicate with each other on a deeper level as well. This deep connection is able to be achieved without words.” Through their blend of visceral noise and captivating visuals, Divide and Dissolve – formed of Takiaya Reed (Black & Tsalagi [Cherokee]) and Sylvie Nehill (Māori) – dismantle the social frameworks that prevent black and indigenous communities from thriving in an equal society.

The accompanying video for ‘Denial’ was shot in Taupo, Aotearoa by indigenous director Amber Beaton. “I’m a huge fan of Divide and Dissolve and so happy to have made this video for them,” Beaton explains. “I understand and appreciate the message behind the music and I wanted to make sure the video held the same intentions no matter how subtle.”

“For instance, we start off with a shot of a Kōwhai tree. Native to Aotearoa, Kōwhai in bloom signifies to Māori that some seafood is ready for harvest, the roots can be used to make fishing hooks, the sap on the sunny side of the tree can be used to heal wounds… but the vibrancy of the yellow flower was also the first thing Captain Cook saw when he arrived on the shores of Aotearoa signalling the start of colonial violence on this whenua/land. The changing colours of its flower in the video represents our change as a country and as people since that fateful arrival.”

Dedicated to shining a light on social injustices both past and present, Divide and Dissolve continue to demand equality on thunderous new offering ‘Denial’, which serves as another reminder of the duo’s talent for creating abrasive yet graceful soundscapes.

Listen to the track below.

 

Follow Divide and Dissolve on bandcampInstagramSpotify, Twitter & Facebook for more updates.

Photo Credit: Billy Eyers

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut