Introducing Interview: CRAWLERS

Based in Liverpool, raging rockers CRAWLERS have spent the last couple of years building a loyal and committed fan base, and have now shared their long awaited debut EP – a diverse collection of emotion-strewn anthems. From the raging, politically-charged energy of ‘Statues’ to the sparkling melancholic splendour of ‘Come Over (again’), each track oozes the band’s trademark impassioned drive and swirling raw charisma.

We caught up with CRAWLERS to find out more about them and their mission as a band…

Hi CRAWLERS, welcome to Get In Her Ears! Can you tell us a bit about the band?
Hiya Get In Her Ears! Crawlers are a four-piece band based in North-West England (half of us from Warrington and the other Liverpool), we formed in late 2018 and like playing around with the sound of rock in any way we can, but most of all we’re four best mates who love creating music. 

How did you initially all get together and start creating music?
Amy (guitarist) and Liv (bass) played together in a few bands in their high school and ended up splitting up when both went to different sixth forms. Holly (vocals) and Liv then went to LIPA Sixth Form in Liverpool, and were into very similar music and decided after dabbling in a few projects to create a band with Amy. We met Harry just after we released our third ever single as he wrote a review of the song for a magazine, and once we said we needed a new drummer he was the perfect fit!

Your new EP CRAWLERS is out now – can you tell us what it’s all about? Are there any themes running throughout the EP?
The EP has mainy themes, however it definitely has an overarching theme of struggles. The first single ‘Statues’ is about the corruption of the American police system, and its institutionalised racism. The second ‘Breathe’ is about my (Holly) existential crisis about the development of social media and technology. The penultimate ‘MONROE’ explores the beauty standards specifically for women in media, and the unfair treatment of Britney Spears. And finally ‘Come Over (again)’, the final track, is about our own personal woes, grief of relationships and family, and most of all, the people who cause such feelings.

You’ve been compared to the likes of Nova Twins and Yungblood, but who would you say are your main musical influences?
We’re very lucky to be compared to both artists as they’re both individually extremely talented! We as a band definitely are inspired by the likes of Nirvana, The Strokes, Queens of the Stone Age, Pixies and Smashing Pumpkins… However, individually we all love very different types of music which allows us to delve into many different types of genres. Holly loves artists such as Mitski, Phoebe Bridgers and Black Country New Road, whilst Liv is a huge metal fan, inspired by bands such as Metalica and Tool. Harry loves Gorillaz and Rage Against the Machine, and Amy is the biggest Fleetwood Mac and ABBA fan possibly ever!  

How is your local music scene? Do you go to see lots of live music?
Liverpool is a wonderful scene currently, exploding with some of the UK’s biggest talents of many alternative genres. Everybody knows everybody and word spreads fast of a new band on the scene and it’s absolutely crazy to start becoming mutual friends with artists and bands we have loved and respected since we first started out in the scene. 

And what can fans expect from your live shows?
As we have grown as artists, we have definitely also grown as performers. For some reason I (Holly) used to pretend to be bada*s on stage, when in reality I’m a bit of a joker. We focus on creating a safe space for all kinds of supporters, as I have sensory issues. I try to ensure when our heavier songs are played that everyone is aware of their space, as well as those around them and their actions, so that everyone can have a good time! I know there’s been a lot of times at heavier gigs when I have personally felt extremely overwhelmed because of the environment, and we wanna let people enjoy heavy music no matter how they like to enjoy it. Not gonna lie, sometimes I do treat a gig like a bit of a comedy show – I have a funny rapport with the audience and a giggle with the band. I feel like that makes it a lot more personal, and when our emotional songs are performed, it feels like we go through every single emotion at our gigs. 

As we’re a new music focused site, are there any new/upcoming bands or artists you’d recommend we check out?
Our current favourites from our scene are definitely Torture and the Desert Spiders, Stone, Gadzooks and Zuzu! All you should definitely check out! Generally I would recommend Witch Fever, Vial, Lowertown, Tash and Charles and the Big Boys too.

And how do you feel the music industry is for new bands at the moment – would you say it’s difficult to get noticed?
It’s a hard one. Social media has definitely made it easier for artists to get noticed, however it has also meant major labels have even more power to control, and has meant the over saturation of artists has made it difficult to stand out. A good time to play around in the live scene, now it is all back and about, and a good time to build a platform! 

Finally, what does 2022 have in store for CRAWLERS?
A lot. We’re going to be going on our first ever tour, and hopefully showing you guys even more of our now very diverse catalogue, hehe. We’re just so lucky for so early in our career to have such amazing supporters and fanbase – and we can’t wait to grow our craft and share it with the world!

Massive thanks to CRAWLERS for answering our questions! Watch the video for latest single ‘Come Over (again)’ here:

PLAYLIST: October 2021

The GIHE team have unearthed more new music gems for you to listen to on our October Playlist! There’s an eclectic mix of indie anthems, gritty guitar tunes, alt-pop tracks & immersive electronic sounds. Take some time to scroll through our track choices below and make sure you hit play on the Spotify playlist at the end of this post.

Follow GIHE on Spotify to hear all of our previous playlists too.

Boy Harsher – ‘Tower’
It’s almost Halloween (aka Goth Christmas) so this shadowy electronic tune is a great way to kick off our October Playlist. Boy Harsher are fully leaning in to their cinematic tendencies on ‘Tower’ which is taken from their upcoming album The Runner. Set for release on 21st January, the record will be a “musical counterpart” to an accompanying short film written, produced & directed by the talented duo. (Kate Crudgington)

Brimheim – ‘poison fizzing on a tongue’
The recent single from Danish alt-pop artist Brimheim, ‘poison fizzing on a tongue’ oozes a glitchy, ethereal splendour. With its soaring, other-wordly allure, it reminds me of the dark majesty of Massive Attack, which is no bad thing! Brimheim releases her debut album Can’t Help Myself Into A Different Shape in January next year. (Mari Lane)

deep tan – ‘Tamu’s Yiffing Refuge’
Following the recent release of their stirring, and utterly unique EP creeping speedwells, East London trio deep tan return with a special one-off single, taken from the label Speedy Wunderground’s new compilation. As strangely kinky as the name would suggest, ‘tamu’s yiffing refuge’ is an explicit tale of furry hedonism. Maintaining all the immersive, seductive allure that we’ve come to know and love from the band, this latest offering oozes an added dark, psychedelic haze and frenzied post-punk drive reminiscent of the likes of legends The Slits. A truly mystical, compelling soundscape that’ll peculiarly entice you into its swirling, fur-filled cacophony. (ML)

New Pagans – ‘Find Fault With Me’
I am thrilled that Belfast’s New Pagans are BACK with this brilliant new single after the release of their debut album, The Seed, The Vessel, The Roots And All earlier this year. Vocalist Lyndsey McDougall says this track is about “checking in with each other and recognising when someone around you needs support.” (KC)

Death Valley Girls – ‘It’s All Really Kind Of Amazing’
A stand alone single from LA dystopian punk band Death Valley Girls, ‘It’s All Really Kind Of Amazing‘ offers a swift glimpse of positivity. As the raw, impassioned splendour of Bonnie Bloomgarden’s vocals soar throughout, it seems to be slightly less doom-laden in tone than previous offerings, but is no less stirring. Oozing a shimmering, trippy allure and swirling, vibrant energy reminiscent of The Kinks’ ‘Sunny Afternoon’, ‘it immerses the listener in its glistening euphoric haze, reminding us to relish those rare moments of beauty that can keep us going through challenging times. A mystically captivating retreat for the ears and mind. (ML)

Laura Lee & The Jettes – ‘Craigslist Boy’
I have drummer Eilis Frawley to thank for introducing me to this BANGER from German-based band Laura Lee & The Jettes. Eilis provides the beats for this playful anthem about vocalist Laura Lee’s experience of being pursued romantically by random men on the German version of eBay. Its relatability will make you laugh and eye roll in equal measure. Check out the accompanying video here. (KC)

Wet Leg – ‘Wet Dream’
Like everyone else with ears, I am OBSESSED with Isle of Wight duo Wet Leg. I caught them at their debut London show at Omeara last week and it was a JOY to listen to their infectious indie anthems. They also walked on stage to ‘Concerning Hobbits’ from The Lord Of The Rings soundtrack, which is an iconic move in itself. (KC)

Queen Cult – ‘Show & Tell’
The latest single from Cheshire band Queen Cult, ‘Show & Tell’ builds with a gritty, swirling energy to an empowered call to arms. I just can’t get enough of its relentless, searing force. (ML)

Nghtfall – ‘Evil Eye’
Following the heartfelt release of ‘I’ll Be Fine’ earlier this year, Toronto based non-binary artist Bradley Milosevic-Hill aka Nghtfall has recently shared ‘Evil Eye’. A sweeping slice of catchy anthemic pop, it oozes swirling feelings of anticipation and desire, creating a twinkling, emotion-strewn ballad. (ML)

girlhouse – ‘boundary issues’
I love this latest track from indie artist girlhouse, taken from her recent EP which is aptly titled, the second EP, quite simply lovely stuff. (Tash Walker)

HAVVK – ‘Halfway Out’
Taken from total faves HAVVK’s epic new album Levelling, stirring single ‘Halfway Out’ oozes an ethereal splendour as the haunting, celestial power of Julie’s vocals immerses the listener instantly. The whole album intertwines this captivating, twinkling majesty with a grunge-tinged grit throughout, and I can’t stop listening to it. I had the pleasure of chatting to front person Julie about the album and more last week – have a read of the interview here. (ML)

Sprints – ‘Modern Job’
I first heard Dublin’s Sprints on The Irish Jam radio show and I’m super grateful to them for the introduction. ‘Modern Job’, which is also the title track on the band’s upcoming EP (due on 11th March) is a scathing “critique of modern existence” and “an exploration of growing up queer” according to vocalist Karla Chubb. I can’t wait to hear the record in full. (KC)

Nova Twins – ‘Antagonist’
GIHE faves Nova Twins have shared this MASSIVE anthem about believing in yourself, full of their trademark lethal riffs and powerhouse vocals. (KC)

Tiger Mimic – ‘Silence Of The Night’
Propelled by an eerie energy, ‘Silence Of The Night’ reflects on the grim reality that women have to navigate on a daily basis. As the rich, sleek vocals of front woman Jess soar with a soulful power, it builds with a stirring tension to an impassioned statement of intent. A poignant call for justice and accountability at a time when we so desperately need it. You can catch the band live at The Victoria in Dalston on 9th December. (ML)

Sister Lucy – ‘Big Kid’
The second single from her upcoming EP Big Girl Pants, Sister Lucy aka Abi Sinclair’s single ‘Big Kid’ is a lush, grunge-tinged reflection on growth and womanhood. She’ll be playing a gig at The Shacklewell Arms on the 10th November to celebrate the EP’s release. (KC)

Elodie Gervaise – ‘Free Babe’
I am so into this song! All its mixed beats, intricate synths and electronics, it’s such a visually evocative track, you can just imagine the light show watching this being performed live. French-Australian artist, Elodie Gervaise’s new EP, Syzygy – which just feels oh so good to say – is out now. (TW)

Errunhrd – ‘Ruminate (Meditate)’
Niagra Falls based artist Errunhrd has penned this buoyant new track which shifts away from her previously more melancholic sounds. ‘Ruminate (Meditate)’ is taken from her debut album You Can Be You, I Can Be Me, which is set for release on 19th November. (KC)

Blonde Maze – ‘One House’
The latest single from New York artist Blonde Maze, ‘One House’ revolves around the comfort of finding a home in someone, especially after a long time of feeling misplaced. Oozing a blissful, soulful splendour, it flows with an utterly dreamy allure as Amanda’s soothing vocals ripple alongside twinkling electro hooks. Lately, as I’ve been going through a bit of a tough time, I’ve had this pretty much on a loop, and its sweeping euphoric energy helps to calm my mind instantly. Thank you Blonde Maze for another perfectly cathartic creation. And I’m SO excited that Blonde Maze’s debut album Something Familiar is set for release next week, 3rd November – haven’t looked forward to an album this much for a long time! (ML)

Mai – ‘Control’
An evocative electronic gem that urges listeners to surrender to the inevitability of change, I love Essex-based musician & vocalist Mai’s has debut single ‘Control’. Released via Cool Thing Records, the track is a collaboration between Mai aka Rosie Gulliver of Petty Phase, and songwriter and producer Liam Watkins from A Cause In Distress. (KC)

BISHI ft. Nikesh Shukla – ‘Language Is an Ocean’
Multi-instrumentalist and GIHE fave BISHI released her third album Let My Country Awake earlier this month, which this single is taken from. The record explores dual identities and urges listeners to lean into compassion and empathy in a chaotic and disconnected world. (KC)

Desire Marea – ‘You Think I’m Horny’ (Planningtorock’s ‘Planningtobehorny’ Version)
Tash & I are still on a high after seeing Planningtorock at Scala earlier this month, so when their remix of Desire Marea’s track ‘You Think I’m Horny’ dropped into my inbox I knew it was going straight on to our playlist! A great collaboration from two fantastic, unique artists. (KC)

AZADI.mp3 – ‘NAZAR’
I’ve been listening to the We Are Lady Parts playlist on Spotify recently and the algorithms led me to AZADI.mp3 – aka Juliette Motamed who plays drummer Ayesha in the hit Channel 4 show. She has a great set of electronic tunes that I’ve been listening to ever since. (KC)

Atna – ‘Smile’
“Why why why why why” …give me bizarre warped repetitive vocals from German avant-pop duo Atna ANY DAY. (TW)

Little Simz – ‘Speed’
Little Simz has done it again, latest album Sometimes I Might Be Introvert (in my case it’s always) is a total, immense masterpiece. ‘Speed’ is my favourite track on the album, in the same vein as previous faves ‘Boss’ and ‘Offence’, it’s propelled by a gritty, driving energy and Simz’s spot on lyricism, with a touch of orchestral grandeur. The perfect motivational anthem I’ve needed lately to get me through the day. (ML)

Kay Young ft. JNR WILLIAMS – ‘I’ve Got You’
‘I’ve Got You’ by London based artist, rapper and producer Kay Young featuring JNR Williams is such a feel good song! It’s taken from her EP This Here Feels Good, released via Play It Again Sam. (TW)

Duval Timothy ft. Lil Silva & Melanie Faye – ‘Fall Again’
I am totally obsessed and in love with this song. Rhythmic piano to start, before it slowly layers and builds with hazy, gentle vocals sweeping over the top. Such a dreamy sonic soundscape that feels so good in my ears. (TW)

Anna Vincent – ‘Naxos’
Having previously charmed us fronting indie-pop outfit Heavy Heart, and as a touring member of Happyness, after two decades making music London based Anna Vincent has now launched her first solo venture. With her debut album, Under The Glass (out today on Max Bloom of Yuck’s new label Ultimate Blends), she has recently been charming our ears with a number of shimmering singles, like the beautifully heartfelt ‘Naxos’. Exuding a spellbinding majestic grace alongside the stirring heartfelt emotion of Anna’s exquisite sparkling vocals, each track offers a truly blissful, captivating soundscape. (ML)

CMAT -‘No More Virgos’
Born from her desire to “marry her love of 80’s Italo disco with her hatred of Virgos,” Irish pop sensation CMAT’s playful new tune is a wry nod to her compulsive romantic decisions. “My mental health is banking on my chastity / and you’re bad for me” she jests over buoyant melodies, gently resisting the urge to circle back and repeat the same pattern of behaviour in her previous relationships. I’m so excited to hear CMAT’s debut album, If My Wife New I’d Be Dead, which is set for release via AWAL Recordings on 25th February 2022 (KC)

 

INTERVIEW: Nova Twins

Almost a year after the release of their debut album Who Are The Girls?, alt-rock duo Nova Twins have returned to share Voices Of The Unheard, a charity compilation LP that’s dedicated to spotlighting artists of colour in the heavy music scene. Available to pre-order until 1st March, Nova Twins, aka Amy Love and Georgia South, have put together a blistering collection of alternative anthems that showcase an eclectic range of talent, featuring tracks from Big Joanie, The OBGMs, LustSickPuppy and more.

We caught up with Amy & Georgia to talk about the new compilation record (supported by Dr Martens Presents), their ongoing conversations about racism in the heavy music scene, their dedication to the underground music community and a shared love for DeathKult leaders Ho99o9…

Make sure you pre-order your copy of Voices for the Unheard here.

Hello Amy & Georgia! It’s been almost a year since you released your debut album, Who Are The Girls? What are you most proud of about this record? Did you get to play any live shows with it before Covid-19 hit?

Georgia: I feel most proud about the amount of people we’ve reached. We get messages that say stuff like “I’m so glad we’ve discovered you” or “we can see ourselves in you, and we can be something different too” because they’re seeing us play a different type of music to what people are used to seeing black women play, you know? When we won the Heavy Music Award last year too, it felt like a big achievement to us, because of what we look like. It was such a big moment for the band, but it was also a big moment for our community as well, so that was great.

Amy: We did manage to tour the record a little bit in March and April last year. We were in France for about nine days, which was great, so at least we got to experience a little bit of the live buzz and the kick you usually get out of making an album. But yeah, we were supposed to play Glastonbury and Reading & Leeds and all these new places for the first time, so we were a little bit gutted that we never got to play the album there.

I think people are listening and paying attention in a different way though. Yes, we’re more online than ever, but I think we can reach more countries and reach more communities this way. I think we’ve discovered a lot of different things and we’ve got to know our audience a lot better. I think the album’s actually done better because of the reach it’s had online, as opposed to us just gigging. Everyone’s in a different headspace now. I think it’s been really, really amazing to take a step back and just get to know our audience and watch them enjoying it as much as we enjoyed making it.

That’s true, people have been really appreciative of new music over the last twelve months.

Another amazing thing that you did in 2020, you wrote an open letter to the MOBO Awards asking the panel to consider adding a Rock/Alternative category to their awards show. They acknowledged your letter with a tweet saying they’re working towards representing alternative music genres in the future. How do you feel about their response?

Amy: I think we still have to now push for it to happen this year. We have to take into account that we’re still struggling through this pandemic and there’s issues with funding and things like that, but I think this is a time to push in the right direction. We’ve got people’s eyes and ears on us now more than ever and people are listening. We just have to keep pushing.

You also started up your Voices For The Unheard platform last year, which was originally a series of Spotify playlists and conversations online highlighting artists of colour in the alternative music scene. That’s now developed into a compilation LP funded by Dr Martens Presents, which is amazing! Did you have a record release in mind when you originally started the platform? Or did it develop naturally?

Georgia: I think it really was a natural evolution, it just kept escalating. It started from the playlist on Spotify and then we thought, why don’t we just chat to these people on our Instagram and have a conversation with them and discover their journey? We ended up having so much in common, even though we’re from different sides of the world, we have this similar feeling being a POC alternative artist on this journey. So that was great to see our audience discover them, as well and for us to meet so many new bands too. When Dr. Martens reached out to us and asked if we wanted to do something with them on a bigger level, that was where the vinyl idea stemmed from. We thought it would be amazing to raise money for The Black Curriculum and to push all of these artists we’d selected and to give them more exposure as well.

As you’ve mentioned, all proceeds from the physical release of Voices For The Unheard will be donated to The Black Curriculum, a charity that addresses the lack of black British history in the UK curriculum. How did you find out about this charity and the work that they do?

Amy: I think it came up on our social media last year when the Black Lives Matter movement started to happen again. All these forums and websites and Instagram pages started popping up. I think before that, we felt quite isolated. It didn’t feel that there was much of a community here for us to join, everything felt sporadic. I remember when AfroPunk held their first London festival at Alexandra Palace and we had all these incredible POC creatives artists and fashion designers turn up, and we were like, where did all these people come from? Because we don’t see them here. We didn’t feel like there was much of a community that we could just go to and feel like accepted, I guess.

So around the time of the BLM movement last year, everyone start reaching out to each other – all of us, no matter where you were from – sharing websites and discovering a whole new world that we didn’t really know existed. I think The Black Curriculum popped up through that and we just thought there was some really interesting stuff on there. We actually had to relearn and are still re-learning our black history. So we just think it’s really, really important for organisations like them to exist.

I grew up in Essex. I’m from Thurrock, and I was probably like, one of maybe two black people in my class? I remember my teacher saying, specifically, “black people are slaves, that’s where they come from, slavery.” Not saying why that might actually be, or how terrible slavery was. So I was like, “Oh, I used to be that?” I remember being quite embarrassed. I was just a kid! You just don’t know any better, you know? My parents are Iranian, so I grew up with my Iranian family. So I was immersed in that culture, but I wasn’t necessarily immersed in my kind of blackness, I guess, until I met Georgia’s family.

It was just painted that white people saved us here in Britain and how great the British Empire was, and how they decided to free us. It was a really strange and backwards way to learn your history.

Georgia: I grew up in London, so it was really diverse at my school. But when it came to black history, all they showed us was the Roots documentary. They said that slavery was bad, but they didn’t teach any other black history. Nothing about black kings and queens and how rich they were. That’s all I took from school.

I guess that’s why The Black Curriculum is so important isn’t it? I grew up in Essex too and I don’t remember anything about black history on the syllabus. Hopefully organisations like this will be able to change that for school kids in the future.

The Voices For The Unheard vinyl has been funded by Dr Martens Presents. What does it mean to you to have this kind of support from such an iconic brand?

Georgia: Dr Martens are our favourite shoe brand, we literally wear them every day. They’re a massive corporation, so their connection to underground music is so helpful. Even with the people that they put on their adverts, they could easily pick a bigger artist but they want to support new bands and they’re always searching for new music, which is refreshing.

Amy: I think it really makes sense for us because we genuinely love the brand. I mean, I could show my feet right now – I’m wearing DMs! It’s a natural alliance and it’s just great for us to be able to have a company invest in ideas support in the community in such a way so it’s brilliant, a really good match.

They’re so good at spotlighting new bands. I remember coming out of Camden tube station about three years ago and seeing the Dr Martens campaign that featured Ho99o9. They had posters of the band all the way up the escalators in the station and all over town, it was so good!

Amy: Yes, we love Ho99o9!

Georgia: I remember seeing the posters too, they were so good!

When it comes to the track-list for the album, how did you narrow it down to 11 songs? Your Voices For The Unheard Spotify Playlists are so extensive, it must have been hard to choose only ten artists?

Georgia: It was really hard! We were like “can’t we have 14 people on the record, please!?” I think many of the people on the track-list are the artists we first discovered and chatted to, so all of the people we’ve had online conversations with are on there. It was really difficult to be honest. We would have added like ten more if we could…

Amy: Exactly. We picked artists like Connie Constance who we love and feel like she is deserving of so much more. There’s obviously bigger artists that we love like Ho99o9 and FEVER333, but they’re kind of big already, so we tried to focus on people who may have not had that kind of kickstart or any kind of attention just yet. We wanted to explore the idea of new bands making new exciting sounds, and who have a new take on things, so we’re just really proud of them all.

Georgia: We wanted to be diverse as well, so there’s a mixture of non-binary and trans artists as well as artists from different cultures on there too.

It’s an amazing album and I can’t wait to get my hands on a physical copy.

So, what else is on the cards for Nova Twins this year? Any new music from you after this compilation release?

Amy: I feel like you never know what’s next for Nova. It’s so funny being in this band, I love it. One day we’ll be sitting there twiddling our thumbs and then suddenly, we’ll just run with this massive new idea. I think there’ll be loads of stuff that we’ll be putting out there, just trying to make shit happen for the community, and also just for us as two girls living in the UK, with a fucking dream, trying to get somewhere.

I think 2021 is going to be good. We’re excited about the new stuff we’re making and excited to join alliances with more artists. I feel like there’s strength in the artists joining together, as opposed to us being competitive with each other.Exciting times!

Thanks so much to Amy & Georgia for chatting with us!

Pre-order your copy of Voices for the Unheard here.

Follow Nova Twins on Spotify, Twitter, Instagram & Facebook

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

ALBUM: Nova Twins Presents ‘Voices For The Unheard’

A year after the release of their debut album Who Are The Girls?, Nova Twins have returned to share Voices Of The Unheard, a charity compilation LP that’s bursting with righteous energy. Driven by their desire to spotlight the work of underrepresented artists of colour in the heavy music scene, the duo (formed of Amy Love and Georgia South) have put together a blistering collection of alternative anthems that showcase an eclectic, tenacious range of talent.

Following their ‘Voices For The Unheard’ Spotify Playlists, an open letter to the MOBO Awards and their online conversations about racism and sexism in music, Nova Twins naturally gravitated towards curating an album that followed up these narratives. Dr Martens Presents (a multi-disciplinary initiative supporting emerging creative talent) brought their idea of a record to life, providing the funding for the physical release of the compilation on limited edition vinyl via Blood Records. Voices For The Unheard is only available for pre-order until 1st March and all profits will be donated to The Black Curriculum, a charitable initiative working to get black history on the UK school syllabus. It’s a deeply political record in many ways, but it’s also a gargantuan distraction from these important issues too.

Amy & Georgia kick things off with their thunderous single ‘Taxi’, filled with Nova Twins‘ trademark distorted bass lines, jagged riffs and ferocious lyrics. Narrowing the track-list down to twelve must have been tricky, as their stellar Spotify playlists include songs by Ho99o9, Bob Vylan, Sampa The Great and Rico Nasty, but the band have tried to give a platform to artists who are rooted in their underground scenes, whether that’s in the UK or further afield.

‘All My Friends’ by Canadian four-piece The OBGMs is a manic mix of punk and garage rock, followed by the gritty charm of Connie Constance‘s ‘Monty Python’. Her track is probably the quietest on the record, but her skill for subtle song-writing punches just as hard as the the visceral metal & hip hop beats on ‘Cross Me’ by Dallas-based UNITYTX. The track burns with corrosive fury, the final lyric “This is rock music motherfucker!” epitomising what Voices Of The Unheard is all about.

The thumping beats and pulverizing synths on ‘Goatmeal’ by New Yorker LustSickPuppy and the intense punk & rap cacophony ‘Scared’ by duo Death Tour both blitz by in under two minutes. Guttural groans, strung out vocals and feverish riffs fuel ‘Aggressive Evolution’ by Liverpool-based Loathe, and their fury is matched by the genre-defying sounds of ‘Green Vision’ by New Yorkers Oxymorrons, who dominate the ear drums from start to finish.

Brit trio Pussycat and The Dirty Johnsons keep things rolling with their classic rock rhythms on ‘Ain’t No Pussy’, followed by the dense beats and incredible vocals on ‘Trouble’ by North Carolina-based queer/trans artist Khx05, who impresses more each time they’re listened to. Washington rapper Zhariah mixes glitchy beats and candid lyrics on the biting ‘Bitch Boy’ before the infectious rhythms of black feminist punk trio Big Joanie bookend this eclectic mix of rap, rock, punk, metal and electronic music. We’ve waxed lyrical about how much we love Big Joanie before on GIHE, and the infectious rhythms on their Hermitage Works live rendition of ‘Fall Asleep’ still have us chanting the chorus in unison every time.

Listening to Voices for the Unheard should rile you up and re-energise your appetite for heavy music. The album showcases a group of artists who have been galvanized by their individual experiences of discrimination, but who are now united in their attempts to create the authentic, exciting music they wish they had heard growing up. Nova Twins’ battle cry for equality and diversity was loud and clear on Who Are The Girls?, but it’s echoed long after the record’s release. The duo are a force for fun, for fury, and most importantly: for change in an industry that is still dominated by white faces.

You can choose to be part of the solution and help to change this by listening to Voices for the Unheard, following the artists on the track-list and continuing to share the conversations that initially fueled the record’s development.

Pre-order your copy of Voices for the Unheard here.

Click on the name of each artist/band to head to their individual Spotify pages.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut