Get In Her Ears @ Notting Hill Arts Club w/ ESYA 30.11.19

Get In Her Ears returned to Notting Hill Arts Club to host another evening of alternative music, headlined by the multi-talented ESYA (Ayse Hassan of Savages/Kite Base/180 db). South London duo Scrounge shared the bill, as we as spoken word artist & drummer Eilis Frawley.

The task of opening the night fell to Berlin-based Eilis, who delivered her unique cacophony of live drums, electronic elements and spoken-word lyrics with captivating precision. Performing singles ‘Strangers’ and ‘Illusions’ (both championed by Radio X’s John Kennedy, who was in attendance), her one woman show felt all the more powerful, as many of her songs are informed by feminist beliefs that align perfectly with GIHE.

Scrounge took to the stage next to perform their savage post-punk noise. Lucy & Luke’s live sets are always a raw, urgent affair; and we felt every beat of tracks ‘Badoom’ and ‘Purpose’. The duo released their EP Ideal, earlier this year, and it’s barely left our ears since. They’re firm favourites of GIHE, and their heavy guitar riffs and knockout drumming sat perfectly between Eilis & ESYA’s sets.

  

Headlining the night and performing her last London show of 2019, ESYA hypnotized us with her dark, brooding electronics. Filled with buzzing synth textures, direct vocals and pummeling beats; her songs flesh out the absurdities of our relationships and interactions with each other. Set highlights included ‘Nothing’, ‘Everything’, and brand new single ‘Blue Orchid’, lifted from her recent EP, Absurdity of ATCG (II) – Emergent Form. She multi-tasks triggering synths, performing  vocals, and plucking bass strings throughout the set, and she’s met with deserved cheers and applause at the end of the show.

Huge thanks to the sound engineer and staff at Notting Hill Arts Club.

Follow the bands on Facebook for more updates: ESYA, Scrounge, Eilis Frawley.

Photo Credit: Jon Mo

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

WATCH: ESYA – ‘Blue Orchid’

“I only came here for the meat” broods ESYA on her latest track ‘Blue Orchid’, lifted from her new EP Absurdity of ATCG (II) – Emergent Form, released in digital form today (15th Nov). Filled with buzzing synth textures, direct vocals and pummeling beats; the song fleshes out the absurdities of our relationships and interactions with each other.

ESYA (aka Ayşe Hassan of Savages/Kite Base/180dB) has been busy cutting her teeth on the solo electronic music circuit since the release of her debut EP, Absurdity Of Being, in 2018. The first of a trio of records, Absurdity of ATCG (I), followed shortly after, and her latest release Absurdity of ATCG (II) – Emergent Form, now completes her “wonky exploration” of alternate personas.

Laced with themes of acceptance and growth, ESYA’s music is a captivating blend of experimental electronics and urgent lyricism. ‘Blue Orchid’ extrapolates on these elements, as do the other six tracks on the new EP. They’re also underscored by a scientific idea, as ESYA explains further:

“This EP is about becoming the next version of yourself, about engaging in the process of coming into being, or becoming prominent…ATCG refers to the building blocks in human DNA, that set the foundations of what we will be before we take our first breath along with the absurdity we encounter in the life/society we are born into. The intention is to be honest, abrasive and direct, confronting the things we fear the most.”

We can’t wait for ESYA to headline our next gig at Notting Hill Arts Club on Sat 30th November. Tickets are available on DICE, and you can find all the event info here. Watch the video for ‘Blue Orchid’ below (directed by Alex Keegan), and grab a copy of ESYA’s new EP on vinyl here.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

Get In Her Ears w/ Hanya, 31.10.19

Mari & Kate were back in the studio on Halloween night playing loads of goosebump-inducing new music from the likes of Vulpynes, Pet Crow, ILL, Hinako Omori, bigfatbig, KLLO & REYKO.

They were joined in the studio by Heather from Brighton band Hanya, who spoke about the band’s upcoming single ‘Dream Wife’ and played acoustic renditions of a few of the band’s tracks.

Listen back:

 

Tracklist:

Nina Simone – ‘I Put A Spell On You’
ESYA – ‘Nothing’
Petrol Girls – ‘No Love For A Nation’
The Kut – ‘Bad Man’
Ex Void – ‘Only One’
Vulpynes – ‘Bitches Are Like Waves’
Brix & The Extricated – ‘Wolves’
KLLO – ‘Dissolve’
REYKO – ‘Don’t Mention My Name’
Foxcunt – ‘Anxiety Dream’
Instant Bin – ‘The Brightest Colours Ever Seen’
Pet Crow – ‘What We Doin’
ILL – ‘Kick Him Out The Disco’
Stereolab – ‘Tone Burst’
Trills – ‘Super Blue Moon’
Rookes – ‘Salvage’
Hinako Omori – ‘Aurelia’
Wilsen – ‘Ruiner’
Eilis Frawley – ‘illusions’
bigfatbig – ‘Science’
Cozy Slippers – ‘Not Hard To Say Goodbye’
Dilary Huff – ‘Overused Sayings’
Ellie Gowers – ‘Against The Tide’
Gold Baby – ‘Philadelphia’
The Cure – ‘A Forest’

 

Get In Her Ears w/ ESYA (Ayse Hassan) 11.07.19

Kate & Mari were back in the studio this week with loads of new tunes from the likes of Grawl!x, Dude York, Life Is Better Blonde, ZAMILSKA, Grapefruit, Gauche & Planningtorock.

ESYA (Ayse Hassan of Savages, Kite Base, 180db) joined them for a chat about her recent EP Absurdity Of ATCG, and her upcoming gig supporting Bo Ningen at The Shacklewell Arms on 24th August.

Listen back here:

@KCBobCut
@marimindles
@getinherears

Tracklist
X Ray Spex – Oh Bondage, Up Yours!
Beckie Margaret – New York
NIMMO – The Power
Petite Meller – Aeroplane
Grawl!x – Epicene
Pongo – Quero Mais Anoraak
Deep Deep Water – Something In The Water
The Eyelids – Suffer
Duck – R*ck St*r
Grapefruit – Soak
Life Is Better Blonde – Winter (feat. Angus Dawson)
Dude York – Should’ve
Zamilska – Hollow
ESYA – Nothing
Giungla – Better Than Ever
Jenny Hval – Sabbath
Salad – Under The Wrapping Paper
Gauche – Flash
Smaller Hearts – Circuitry
Atelier Blue – Empty Lungs
Mauno – Take Care
Emma McGrath – Other Side
GEISTE – Ocean
HEALTH (feat. Soccer Mommy) – Mass Grave
Zola Jesus – Bound
Planningtorock – Beuhla Loves Dancing

INTERVIEW: ESYA

Performing under her new moniker ESYA, Ayşe Hassan (Savages, Kite Bass, 180dbm) has been busy crafting electronic sounds designed to delve in to the obscure and absurd nature of life. Having recently self-released her second EP titled Absurdity of ATCG (I), her trademark thunderous basslines are now fused with urgent synths and brooding vocals which captivate by their marked urgency to tell the truth.

Propelled by her desire to always be creating, her new (and older) projects are as eclectic as her influences; ranging from Gazelle Twin to Hannah Peel. We caught up with Ayşe before her headline gig at Hackney venue The Glove That Fits to talk about her new EP, her plans for the year, and what first inspired her to venture in to electronic music… 

Hello Ayşe, what are your anticipations for tonight’s ESYA gig at The Glove That Fits?

With this project, it’s brand new because it’s electronic and I’m singing, so I have slightly different concerns compared to if I was just playing bass. I just want to make sure that everything sits correctly in the mix, which is hard as I’m behind the speakers so I have to trust the sound engineer. I’m excited. I really enjoy doing something that scares me. I feel scared again – in the good way – in the fluttery way when you play in front of people and you’re nervous.

You released your first EP Absurdity Of Being last year. How does your new EP – Absurdity of Atcg, Pt. 1 – differ? What have you learned in the interim between the two releases?

The whole idea of the EPs is that they’re going to be a trio. The first one focused on the construction of the voice, which is my voice and the fact I’ve never really sang live before. This must be the fifteenth time I’ve sang live. The second EP focuses more on electronics which is also quite new to me, as I’ve had to go through this learning curve of learning how to use the equipment I have and how to make it sound good in multiple venues and spaces. The third EP is going to focus more on sounds and bass, so it’ll be a record led by bass and electronics, which I’m writing now. I write a bit every day, I’m constantly writing. The difference between the first and the second EP is that with the second one I was more focused writing the electronics. So on the vinyl I decided to put out, I didn’t want the first few tracks to have a split, I wanted a continual 16 minute song, because that’s how it was originally written.

That sounds really cohesive. The title of your new EP references ATCG – the building blocks in human DNA – how did this influence the sound of your music? It’s quite a unique concept.

I think it’s just me focusing on what I’ve been going through in the past 6-8 years. Life is kind of insane, and it’s kind of absurd and I feel like the whole concept of it and the experiences we go through have a humour in them, but also a beauty that we’re all here on this planet and it’s all a bit mind-blowing. On a more microscopic level – or not [laughs] – being in a band like Savages and playing to thousands of people, and then basically going back to starting something [like ESYA] from scratch is kind of absurd. I find it funny in a strange way because you should never be too comfortable, life has a funny was of messing around with you.

I think the ATCG title is fitting because everything that I sing about on the two records is a reference to the life that I lead, so I feel like it encapsulates every kind experience. There’s so many angles that I was looking at that title from, and I really liked that it could mean so many things to so many different people. Depending on your own experiences, it’s quite ambiguous. I felt that was also relevant to what I was going through and I wanted to express that all of this is absurd so just enjoy life.

Sounds great. What kind of reaction have you had from fans and critics so far?

I self-released both records, so I’ve had a limited budget and I’ve been working in order to earn the money to put out my EPs. I’ve only got 50 vinyl left of the new EP, and I’ve sold out of the first one which is amazing, and most importantly people are responding well to the music. It’s different to what I’ve done before, you’re hearing my voice and everything is recorded by me. I’ve done everything, which has been a challenge in itself. I’m not a Producer, I’ve never really recorded myself other than to write demos, so it’s been a huge learning curve which I’ve found quite empowering.

One thing that used to frustrate me in the past with other records, is that I felt like I didn’t have as much control as I would’ve liked. There’s so much beauty in imperfection, so [the recording] doesn’t have to be perfect. The vocals on both EPs were recorded with just a handheld microphone, so it’s pretty lo-fi if you compare it to a studio record. The bass is recorded in a similar way as well, and I love that. I feel like we’re bombarded with over-produced stuff at the moment and I wanted it to be honest. I’ve worked a job that I don’t particularly like in order to put this record out there, and it’s really amazing that people have purchased it. I really appreciate that.

Having been on a label before, it’s really interesting to see the differences and learn how to navigate an environment without the help of a label. PR was a big thing, when you’re doing it yourself you have to think of everything. How to be creative with getting the word out. I come from a very particular world where I started playing punk bass and have always done things myself, and then being in a band where we were lucky enough to have the support of a big label, and then going back to doing it all myself – I have a lot of respect for musicians who don’t have that kind of support. Because it’s hard, really hard.

Being in different bands sounds like it’s taught you a lot then. From Savages, Kite Base, 180db, and now your new solo project – can you talk me through how each has led to the other? What’s different between what you’ve released before, and the music you’re writing now?

I absolutely love playing live, so me creating this new project was born out of the frustration of being on other people’s schedules. I can’t control when other people need to rest and I do respect that, but also for myself I need to keep playing live, it’s in my blood. Even when I was a teenager I used to put on shows in my house at house parties and get friends bands to come over and play – my neighbours hated it! I was originally thinking with this new project that I was just going to do living room shows, nothing at a venue. So I can go back to really being up close to people and doing the things I’ve missed doing for so many years. It’s that intensity when you’re close to people who really love music, and it’s just you and them, so close to each other.

With Savages I was a bass player, but we all came together to write. I knew at some point because we’d been touring so intensely people would need to take a rest, so midway through that time I started Kite Base, because I wanted to have another option of being able to tour and play. Also, when you’re with three other people who are as passionate about the music you make it can be complicated, it can be amazing but it can be dysfunctional.

With Kite Base it was easier because we were a duo, two halves make a whole! We achieved some really cool things, we put out a record that I love, and we supported Nine Inch Nails [on their American tour] last year which was incredible. That was just the most ultimate of dreams. To actually be able to achieve that in a slightly different way was really special to me. Kite Base was self-funded and we went through stages of having managers and not having managers, so it was another short sharp lesson of how to use what I’d learned through Savages and put it in to practice, which I think is a really great thing to do. We sorted everything for ourselves so it was quite intense. The cost to get out there, and bearing in mind we were self-funding everything, we knew there was no way we weren’t going to say yes to the tour – but the logistics were quite stressful at points. If my visa got turned down, I would’ve cried!

Alongside that, me and Faye [Savages’ drummer] decided to write together. I love working with Faye, I really connect with her so we thought we’d do collaborations. We’re working on a record at the moment and it will feature lots of guest singers, people who we admire, and we’re really happy with the people we’ve worked with so far. My first shows [as EYSA] were just in living rooms performing to friends in America after the Nine Inch Nails tour, just to try out whether I could sing live. I knew I was going to put out an EP because I had so much material and I didn’t want to waste it.

That’s interesting, with the singing, did you always know you could sing? Or was it a confidence issue? Or something that you picked up along the way?

I always wanted to focus solely on one thing. I didn’t want to sing while I was playing bass because I wanted to focus my whole attention on playing one instrument and to lose myself, which I did. I remember many years ago Jehnny [Savages lead singer] joked about me having a mic and I remember thinking “I do not want to sing”. I don’t feel like I’m a natural in front of a mic. Maybe it was because I’d never tried it, but it got to a point where I was so frustrated because there were no shows coming up and I didn’t know when I’d be performing live again, that I thought I’d just try it. How scary could it be? Turns out, it was quite scary!

I think the way I sing has an honesty to it, and I’m talking about things that mean a lot to me so it wouldn’t have worked if someone else was singing it other than me. I remember saying to Jehnny not that long ago that my respect for people who front and sing lead vocals in a band has gone up so much, because having to go through that process is so hard. Even just thinking of the things you say in the spaces between songs! I had a different idea of what that would be before I did it, and it takes a lot of balls. To do it well and master the techniques with the mic and your environment. I’ve gone from playing my bass with my eyes closed not giving a shit about anything other than performing and playing as well as I can, not worrying about my environment and just losing myself. Also, for practical reasons – I can just get in a car with my synth and my drum machine and that’s it. I can be there, and I can sing.

That sounds great too. Who inspired you to first pick up a bass? And who or what got you in to using FM & Analog synths?

With the bass, it was the frustration of wanting to play an instrument but feeling like I couldn’t. At the time I was listening to a lot of David Bowie and Nine Inch Nails and I feel like with the bass, it wasn’t really one person or one thing that inspired me to play, it was a series of things and influenced by what I was listening to. I remember getting really in to Nirvana and thinking “I just wanna play something”. Then I happened to meet someone who needed a bass player, but I couldn’t play bass at the time. They were like “you don’t have to know how to play bass!” which in the context of the band I didn’t really, and I loved that. So I got in to loads of bands who at the time who were just loads of dudes and I was always just the female bass player. Then I got in to a band with Gemma [Savages guitarist] and we had a great lead singer and things were going well, and then when he left Gemma & I wanted to keep going – but I was working full-time and we wanted to play at least three times a week – but then we found Jehnny and then we found Faye, so it all came together. What’s really important is that I’ve always trusted my instincts. I’ve always known that I love making music, even just for myself. I lose myself in what I’m creating.

What advice would you give to anyone who’s trying to learn either of these instruments?

Just do it. Even if you feel like you can’t play, there’s nothing that’s stopping you. You can always learn. With the electronics, you don’t have to have super expensive gear. I use a keyboard Yamaha DX reface which is £200, and that’s quite cheap compared to other equipment. You can make music from sound recordings, I’ve done that in the past. Do what feels true to you, you don’t have to learn to play an instrument in a particular way, go with what feels right for you. That’s what I did with bass, my style has come from not really learning how to play. I play really low, which is terrible for the back, but I always wanted to be able to play like crazy and to be really solid at keeping the rhythm and lose myself in it and enjoy that moment. Over the years, I’ve been thinking more about tone and stuff, but I think you should do what scares you. If you’re scared to play a particular instrument – just do it. Once you’ve done it, you can just create.

If you’d told me that I’d be singing and playing electronics when I was 16, I’d be like “No way…” so you don’t have to stick to one thing. If you connect with an instrument, just go for it. The more you play, the better you get.

That’s great advice. What are your plans for the rest of the year?

I’m thinking about playing some more shows that are in record stores and are really intimate, because that terrifies me! Technique-wise, I think that’s a really good learning process to go through, and to connect with people. If I can play somewhere where people literally love the records on the shelves around them, that’s really sweet.

The third ESYA EP and the record with 180db will probably be coming out later this year too.

Who are you listening to? Recommendations?

Hyperstition duo who are playing with me tonight, they are two members from a Sheffield-based band called Blood Sport who I love.

I also love Gazelle Twin. I went to see her at Red Gallery – it might not be called that anymore, but it’s a venue near Old Street – and after she came off stage I was like “CAN YOU SIGN MY VINYL?!” and she was like “are you kidding me?” [laughs]. She’s been an inspiration to me actually, because it’s just her and her partner live, and she’s a Mother as well. I really respect how hard she works and how she juggles all of those things. She’s amazing. Her second album Unflesh, that was the soundtrack to my nightmares and I remember telling her that! It comes from a dark place, but it’s so powerful. The honesty in it, that’s why I was so attached to it.

Hannah Peel, slightly different vibe, but she is incredible too. It’s not the typical thing I’d listen to, but the way she plays violin is amazing. I did a tour with her as Kite Base, she played and so did I Speak Machine and after watching them I thought they were both amazing. Tara [of I Speak Machine] is a genius with electronics. These women are pioneers when it comes to electronic music.

Thanks so much to Ayse for answering our questions! Buy your copy of ESYA’s EP Absurdity of ATCG (I) here.

Photo Credit: Chiara Ceccaioni

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

LISTEN: ESYA – ‘Nothing’

One of the most talented and easily recognisable bass players of recent times, Ayşe Hassan has shared her latest single ‘Nothing’ under new moniker ESYA. Having played in Savages, Kite Base​ and 180db, the musician has embarked on a new solo project designed to delve in to the obscure and absurd nature of life.

Taken from her upcoming EP ​Absurdity of ATCG (I) which is set for release on 24th May, ‘Nothing’ is driven by Hassan​’s trademark thunderous bass lines. It’s been described as “an existential industrial pop exploration” acknowledging and grieving the “profound impact of our relationships, choices and experience”. Both musically and vocally, EYSA’s music is an intense and brooding affair; propelled by a marked urgency to tell the truth.

The new EP is the second in a series of ESYA’s self-released works exploring the “myriad manifestations of selfhood through a whirlwind of FM and analog synths, drum machines and vocals”. Incorporating sounds and visuals recorded at significant points throughout the last year – and with the record taking it’s name from the building blocks in human DNA – ESYA is delving in to transgressive audio visual territory and we can’t wait to hear more.

Listen to ‘Nothing’ below and catch ESYA live at her EP launch at The Glove That Fits on 30th May (tickets here).

Photo Credit: Chiara Ceccaioni

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

PLAYLIST: Galentine’s Day 2018

Grrrls, it’s the best day of the year: GALENTINE’S DAY! Coined by Parks and Recreation character Leslie Knope (played by Amy Poehler) back in 2010, Galentine’s has since been recognised by girls across the globe, and used as a light-hearted platform to celebrate the girls and women who enrich our lives.

We wanted to celebrate it with you in the best way possible: by chucking some of our favourite female artists on a big old playlist. We’re all about self-love & sisterly love today, so scroll down, press play, and share that big ol’ Galentines love!

Bikini Kill – ‘Rebel Girl’ 
What can I say? The ultimate anthem for female unity and sisterly love. Singing of the affection and admiration felt for a best friend, Kathleen Hanna reminds us of the importance of telling the queens of our world how much they mean to us. (Mari Lane)

The Nyx – ‘Myself’
I told you The Nyx would feature on all of our playlists this year! Chuck ‘Myself’ on whenever you start to doubt how great you are. It’s a reminder that you are enough, which is something Mari & Tash are quick to say to me whenever I’m having a bad day. Thanks Grrrls. (Kate Crudgington)

Chromatics – ‘Girls Just Wanna Have Fun’
A great cover of a great track. ‘Girls Just Wanna Have Fun’ always reminds me of a story about this 60 year old Italian woman who walked into her local fire station as she was having trouble with her lock. When the firemen asked the woman where she lived, thinking she’d locked herself out of her house, she lifted her sweater and showed them her chastity belt. (Tash Walker)

Chastity Belt – ‘Joke’
Which leads me nicely on to my next track by Chastity Belt. This was one of the bands I discovered at the start of Get In Her Ears, all those years ago, and just reminds me so much of what it was like at the start of it all. Three years on here’s to my two GIHE gals Mari & Kate, and all of the jokes we’ve had along the way. (TW)

Wolf Alice – ‘Bros’
Taken from their knockout debut album My Love Is Cool, ‘Bros’ is one of my favourite Wolf Alice tracks. The video shows two young girls eating chips, colouring each others nails in with felt tip pens, and climbing trees; all past-times my siblings & I used to indulge in as kids. Waves of nostalgic joy smother me every time I hear this beautiful track. (KC)

Kesha – ‘Bastards’ 
What would a GIHE playlist be without a Kesha choice from me…? “Don’t let the bastards get you down, don’t let the assholes wear you out.” – wise words from the artist, and ones which we’ve all recited to our friends as we’ve hugged and sought strength from each other during tough times. (ML)

Pretenders – ‘Alone’
I was lucky enough to see the Pretenders live last year, and they opened their Hammersmith Apollo set with this anthem of independence. Chrissie Hynde is the ultimate example of a woman making her way through the world with talent, stamina, and absolutely no apologies. (KC)

Shirley Ellis – ‘Soul Time’
I love this song, it’s just so much fun and completely infectious. Shirley Ellis often unfairly categorised as a novelty act by many music historians has a well earned place in the history of American soul.  Funky, sophisticated and sassy.  All the sisterly love for her! (TW)

Miss Eaves – ‘Thunder Thighs’ 
This is a fantastically empowering and uplifting anthem for all us gals – encouraging us to celebrate and take pride our body, whatever shape or size it may be. Thank you, Miss Eaves, for this wonderful lesson in self-love. (ML)

TLC – ‘No Scrubs’
This track is almost a decade old, but it’s still the best thing to spin after you’ve been mugged off by a fuckboy, or when you’re getting ready to paint the town red with your girl gang. (KC)

Ji Nilsson & Marlene – ‘Love You Anyway’
Released back in 2014 this was the first song that jumped to mind for this Galentine’s Day playlist, Love You Anyway is all about female friendship. The lyrics speak of solidarity but with a slight note of sadness, combined with the enchanting quality to the music the whole thing intertwined together is mesmerising. (TW)

Nicki Minaj & Beyonce – ‘Feeling Myself’ 
This perfect collaboration between Queen B and Nicki Minaj offers a super uplifting and witty message of self confidence and female unity, with a massive middle finger up to society’s expectations of girls having to be ‘good’/modest in order to be respected. (ML)

Peaches – ‘Boys Wanna Be Her’ 
Although each track on the incredible Impeach My Bush is a pretty hard-hitting, empowering masterpiece, ‘Boys Wanna Be Her’ is just a perfect celebratory anthem; as Peaches explains – “It’s just a celebration. Seriously. I want it to be like a post-gender and post-age celebration of becoming who you are.” (ML)

Dream Nails – ‘LoveFuck’
Dream Nails are all about self love and sisterhood, and I never get tired of their music or their inspiring activism. Whether you’re newly single, happily single, or fed up of being single: this track is designed to restore your faith in the good fucks again. Hang in there girls. They’re out there waiting for ya. (KC)

Deap Vally – ‘Smile More’ 
I just love this powerful and refreshingly tongue-in-cheek offering from this incredible duo. With lyrics such as “I am not ashamed of my mental state/And I am not ashamed of my body weight…”, ‘Smile More’ is the perfect motivational mantra that incites in me a strength to get up and face the world. (ML)

Savages – ‘When In Love’
I remember scoring last minute tickets to see Savages’ sold out Roundhouse gig back in 2016 and feeling so excited I nearly threw up at my desk. I went on my own to see them in the flesh, and it was one of the best things I’ve ever witnessed. I’ll always remember Jehnny Beth telling her crowd that this track was about knowing how love is going to fuck you up, but you should have the nerve to go ahead and pursue it anyway. A reckless, but  brilliant piece of advice. (KC)

Carole King – ‘You’ve Got A Friend’ 
Having sung this at my loved ones many a time, ‘You’ve Got A Friend’ fills me with emotion on each listen. An uplifting message of unity and platonic love, Carole King once again continues to inspire me, my mother before me, and women everywhere, with this beautiful, heartfelt anthem. (ML)