GIHE: Personal Highlights Of 2020

2020 has been a year unlike any other and we’ll be glad to see the back of it, but before we wave goodbye, the GIHE team would like to share some of their personal highlights. Thanks to everyone who has been following, reading or listening to GIHE this year. It really does mean the world to us and we couldn’t do this without you.

Shared Highlights

Seeing the GIHE name appear in a PHYSICAL BOOK was a landmark moment for the team this year. Music journalist Lucy O’Brien mentioned us in her 25th anniversary edition of She Bop, a fantastic book that explores the role of female artists and how they’ve helped to shape the music industry. You can buy your copy here.

Fellow GIHE Co-Founder Tash Walker was super busy recording & producing series 2 of The Log Books throughout 2020, a podcast which explores the history of the LGBTQ community via the phone archives of LGBT+ charity Switchboard. Tash is a co-chair at Switchboard and she is dedicated to celebrating and supporting the LGBTQ community through her work with them, and through her work with GIHE. She is one of the most resilient, informed and hilarious people we know and it’s a privilege to work alongside her and call her a friend. The Log Books are a truly necessary listen for all.

Now for some personal highlights…

Kate Crudgington (Features Editor)

GIHE usually takes up a big part of my life, but it was a lifeline for me during March of this year when the government text me (lol) telling me to shield for 12 weeks. Thanks to the magic of the internet, I was able to talk to the people who were making the music that was distracting me from the panic-inducing headlines, reminding me what a huge privilege it is to have access to this amazing platform.

As our followers already know, Lockdown 1.0 instantly put a stop to our weekly GIHE new music shows on Hoxton Radio. We had 16 weeks off air, so when it was “safe” for me to go back in to the studio in July I was buzzing with excitement (which you can hear in my voice if you listen back to the show here.)

Like most platforms during the pandemic, we embraced technology and started interviewing artists over Zoom instead of inviting them in to the studio for the usual chat and live session. We managed to get time with Jessica Winter, BISHI, Lucy O’Brien, Tessa from Girlhood, Julia-Sophie, Lizzie from Bitch Falcon, Grave Goods, Problem Patterns, ZAND, Hannah from PELA, Seraphina-Simone & Penelope Trappes. It was so lovely to see Tash in person in the studio most weeks, and while we both missed seeing Mari a great deal, her weekly track contributions to the show still made it feel like a GIHE team effort.

At the beginning of the year, I was invited by Niall Jackson, one of the hosts of Riverside Radio’s The Irish Jam, to be a contributor to their New Music Sunday section. Co-hosted by Kealan, Mel and Rob, The Irish Jam is a London based radio show that celebrates and promotes music from Irish artists. The crossover of favourite bands between GIHE & the Jam is huge and something I’ve enjoyed chatting to the team about both on and off air. They’ve introduced me to the likes of CMAT, fears, Denise Chaila, Silverbacks and Celaviedmai, whilst I’ve shared tracks by Kynsy, Party Fears and CAMI with them. Listening to their show on a Sunday evening continues to be a wonderful distraction from life.

Who could’ve predicted that bandcamp would become the musical hero of 2020? When the streaming platform announced that on the first Friday of every month they’d be waiving their fees so that 100% of profits would be going directly to artists, my newsfeeds were awash with new music recommendations. Moving home to Essex from London in March meant I actually had some expendable income to buy new records, so I was furiously typing bespoke recommendation threads on Twitter every time the date rolled around. bandcamps’ generosity meant you were able to genuinely support your friends (and the artists you secretly wish you were friends with) during a truly depressing year for music.

Normally, we’d be picking our live music highlights too, but for obvious reasons, we’ve hardly been to any gigs this year. Mari had to cancel half of the gigs GIHE she had booked pre-pandemic and it’s fucking depressing to not know when it will be (properly) safe for her to book more. That’s why I feel incredibly fortunate to have wedged in one last GIHE gig before Lockdown 1.0. GIHE worked together with Sofar Sounds to put together a special International Women’s Day gig at their Hackney HQ in March, with Beckie Margaret, Amahla and Indian Queens on the bill. It was so exciting (and nerve-racking) to host the evening with fellow GIHE pal Tash too. Even if I’d had a year full of gigs, this one still would’ve made my highlights list.

One last gloat – I published some of my all-time favourite features on our website this year. My Zoom interviews with the wonderful A.A Williams, the hilarious CMAT and the ultra talented Lido Pimienta are well worth a read.

Mari Lane (Managing Editor)

It goes without saying, most of the highlights I’d normally mention at this time of year were not able to go ahead in the void of 2020. They would normally consist of the monthly gigs that I host at The Finsbury, whereas this year I was only able to put on two before Covid hit. And, in addition to having to cancel at least seven of our regular gigs, we were pretty heartbroken to cancel what would have been our very first festival, due to take place in July. However, I did manage to fit in a couple of memorable live experiences before being confined to being permanently pyjama clad; my only weekly highlight being our regular beer delivery from Croydon’s Art & Craft bar.

The first gig I hosted this year felt particularly special. Personal Best headlined a night filled with all the best vibes. Drawing the night to a memorable close, front person Katie Gatt dedicated their set closer to the queer community. As a sea of buoyant voices joined in with “I wanna kiss you in the street / where everyone can see / ’cause this is what we look like,” the poignancy of the lyrics was overwhelming and an empowering sense of unity took hold. The night also included the shimmering folk-strewn offerings of Athabaska, the quirky energy and sparkling charisma of Nun Habit and the sun-drenched swirling anthems of Hurtling. There is nothing quite like that joyous sense of togetherness that comes from hosting gigs filled with like-minded wonderful people.

I was also lucky enough to fit in seeing one of my all time favourite bands with a few of my all time favourite people. The last time that Tash, Kate, Paul and I were all together pre-Covid was for Sleater Kinney at Brixton Academy – a pretty special night. Not only did I get to see the legendary Carrie Brownstein deliver her distinctive gritty, scuzz-filled riffs alongside Corin Tucker’s unmistakable swooning vocals in the flesh, conjuring up massive feelings of awe and nostalgia, but they were supported by one of our favourite current bands. The second time we’d seen Big Joanie on the Brixton Academy stage (the first being opening for Bikini Kill last year!), they showcased just how deserving they are of their rising success; with their unique, raw, post-punk soundscapes and poignant lyricism, they delivered an absolutely incredible set. A truly memorable night.

My last ‘outing’ before lockdown was to the BBC 6Music festival for International Women’s Day at The Roundhouse. An epic line-up consisting of some incredible women and non-binary folk that I’m incredibly grateful I got to witness before everything fell apart. In addition to the immense poignant power of Jehnny Beth, the utterly beguiling splendour of Nadine Shah (who I fell in love with there and then), and the completely mind-blowing presence of hero Kim Gordon, Kae Tempest delivered a fiercely moving, truly breath-taking headline set.

And then gigs were gone. To be replaced by online streamed “events” which I think have had mixed reviews over the last few months – they’re of course no replacement for the “real thing” and it’s hard to feel motivated to “attend” things when you’ve been on the sofa in your pjs for weeks. However, I have managed to organise a few GIHE Instagram ‘Takeovers’, featuring some of our favourite bands and artists. From ARXX’s drum and guitar lessons, LibraLibra’s quirky tele-sales style feature and Tiger Mimic’s interviews with others on the scene, to inspiring chats with Amaroun, Eckoes, Foundlings and Husk, beaut “live” sessions from Gold Baby, Scrounge and KIN, and King Hannah’s EP run through, I feel grateful that so many creatives have wanted to be involved.

It’s a strange time, no doubt, but one which is made that much better by a sense of togetherness within the community. One positive from all this really has been the mutual support and genuine care that I’ve seen musicians and those within the industry show for each other.

John McGovern (Contributor)

On the one hand, there’s been almost no gigs, no festivals, much fewer physical releases and closed record shops. On the other, BBC 6Music’s response helped me stay indoors and make the most of my furlough life. Lauren Laverne‘s show was extended to cover the late morning, running to nearly double the length of most of the other shows on the station and basically saw her appointed as chief mood-lifter for the BBC’s flagship alternative music station. Amongst the days of uncertainty, where even leaving the house offered the risk of serious illness, with no guarantee of a job at the end of the summer, having Lauren there to soundtrack breakfast/brunch made a world of difference. It produced a kind of odd stasis: the background radiation of a pandemic, but an excellent range of music, usually featuring a smattering of classics, new music and obscure gems. The only disappointment was when the schedule reverted back to usual come the end of lockdown. Hopefully, that same semblance of normality will be back for us all, soon.

Thanks to everyone who took the time to read our highlights!

You can read about our GIHE Albums of 2020 here and our GIHE Tracks Of 2020 here.

Keep an eye out for our Ones To Watch in 2021 feature next week!

PLAYLIST: May 2020

At Get In Her Ears, we’re still sharing all the new music we can in order to distract you from the day-to-day reality of lockdown life. Our May playlist is filled with some electronic stunners, a couple of grunge-infused ragers, and the occasional tentative jazzy tune. Take some time to scroll through our track choices below, and make sure you hit play on the Spotify playlist at the end of the page.

Jessica Winter – ‘Sad Music’ 
This latest single from Jessica Winter hits your ears with its full force of pop beats, electronica and snappy synths. At a time like this, I’m loving the unifying lyrics and pulsing vibes of this track, which tells you upfront to lean into the expression music gives you, as Winter explains: “This song was born out of a particularly bad day and how music was a saviour at that time”. Jessica Winters’ debut EP will be released on 22nd May. (Tash Walker)

Beckie Margaret – ‘God’
Released via Cool Thing Records, Beckie Margaret’s latest single is a truly beautiful reflection on what it feels like to be caught in the grasp of a love that’s not reciprocated. I reviewed the track for The Line Of Best Fit, so if you want to read 200 words on how emotional she makes me, you can click here. (Kate Crudgington)

Temples Of Youth – ‘Suburbia’
The new single from GIHE faves, Temples Of Youth, ‘Suburbia’ is another truly majestic offering from the Winchester duo. An utterly dreamy soundscape oozing a twinkling emotion and mystical allure, as heaving synths are interwoven with fuzzed out hooks, whilst the beautifully rich vocals of Jo Carson soar. (Mari Lane)

Tora – ‘Call Your Name’
This is the second release from new R&B artist Tora. ‘Call Your Name’ focuses on confronting the conflicting unbalanced power dynamics that she sees in the world, a truly empowering call to arms that will get you moving whilst raging. Love it. (TW)

Allegra Krieger – ‘Rot’ 
‘Rot’ is the latest release from Brooklyn based Allegra Krieger, aptly named for a song about toxic apathy, originally inspired by the climate crisis. Kriege says it’s a tale of “someone who has assimilated into a culture of wanting and taking without reparation,” which mirrors the human arrogances exposed by the COVID-19 crisis. I love the grunge rock tone to this single. (TW)

Tired Lion – ‘Waterbed’
When I grow up, I want to be a guitar-wielding, chain-smoking Nun – just like Tired Lion’s front-woman Sophie Hopes in the accompanying video to this track. ‘Waterbed’ is a grunge-infused goodbye to the past, and a bold leap into the band’s future sound. (KC)

Diet Cig – ‘Who Are You?’
Flowing with Alex Luciano’s luscious honey-sweet vocals, infectious jangly melodies and all the twinkling energy you could ever need, ‘Who Are You?’ is a delectably catchy slice of dreamy indie-pop from Diet Cig. Juxtaposing an emotion-strewn lilting charm and subtle gritty angst, it’s a shimmering, sunny delight; perfectly uplifting isolation listening. Diet Cig’s new album, Do You Wonder About Me? is out now. (ML)

MOURN – ‘Call You Back’
An edgy, relatable exploration of the anxieties around answering the phone; MOURN’s latest single is an instantly gratifying, cathartic guitar tune. Released via Captured Tracks, the Catalan-based trio are adept at tapping into universal insecurities, providing a personal angle, and deconstructing them through indie guitar hooks and direct vocals. (KC)

Ganser – ‘Lucky’
Ganser’s music has garnered comparisons to 90s noise-makers Fugazi, Shellac, and Sonic Youth. Their jolting rhythms, confrontational vocals, and manic riffs fuse together to create defiant, jarring tunes; and new single ‘Lucky’ is a sturdy example of this. (KC)

Scrounge – ‘Etch’ 
Not a new song, but a darn good one. ‘Etch’ by Scrounge got me through one of my lowest moments during this lockdown. The infectious drums, catchy chorus and memories of seeing them live dragged me out of my cloud and reminded me of the importance of music in dealing with life’s challenges. Thank you Scrounge – I owe you. x (TW)

Alice Bag – ‘Spark’
The new single from prolific punk legend Alice Bag, ‘Spark’ is propelled by gritty hooks and a punk-fuelled frenzied energy, as the raw power of Bag’s vocals rage with a passion, asserting “Hell no, I’m not dimming my spark!” An uplifting burst of empowering strength in the face of adversity; a wonderfully vibrant and super catchy celebration of queer culture and the joy that comes with being able to express your true self. (ML)

Stef Fi – ‘Nowhere’
Lifted from her debut EP, Girlhood, Stef Fi’S single ‘Nowhere’ is a lo-fi dose of grunge-infused punk. The quiet, uncertain lyrics of the verses contrast well with the distorted riffs and defiant words in the chorus. Best known as the vocalist & guitarist of black feminist punk band Big Joanie, Stef Fi’s (aka Stephanie Phillips) debut shows “sketches of a girl” resisting hate, and trying to find hope in the harshest of realities. (KC)

Gulls – ‘Shame Shame Shame’
Propelled by thrashing beats and a driving, riotous force, ‘Shame Shame Shame’ could not have come to our ears at a better time. A spot on social commentary, rallying against fascists and the insidious alt-right, it oozes a frenzied impassioned energy that we need now more than ever, asserting that we will not tolerate intolerance. A perfect slice of angst-driven punk; a truly necessary listen right now. Gulls were also due to be playing for us tonight at The Finsbury – we really hope to be able to book in the Brighton band again in the future. (ML)

Peaness – ‘Kaizen’
Another band I was supposed to be seeing live this week, at The Lexington on Wednesday, I had been super excited about catching the sunny, jangly melodies and sparkling uptempo energy of Manchester/Chester trio Peaness. Oozing their trademark ‘Pea-positivity’, ‘Kaizen’ is the perfect antidote to these strange and scary times. If you’d like to help venues like The Lexington keep afloat while so many events are being cancelled right now, find out more about The Music Trust’s #SaveOurVenues campaign here.  (ML)

Jemma Freeman and the Cosmic Something – ‘Keytar’ (I Was Busy)
Jemma Freeman and the Cosmic Something were due to be headlining for us tonight (Fri 8th May)at The Finsbury, and – as with all the gigs we’ve had to cancel recently – we’re super gutted that it’s had to be postponed. They have wowed us with their magnificent charisma and immense psych-infused offerings live before, and it would have been such an honour to have them return, this time at the top of the bill. (ML)

CLT DRP – ‘Like Father’ (Sit Down Remix)
Having previously completely blown us away with their live set at The Finsbury, Brighton trio  CLT DRP have now returned to blast into our ears with a seething new offering. A magnificent, whirring electro-punk cacophony that addresses the complexities of family ties, ‘Like Father’ is driven by a swirling, impassioned energy, oozing a poignant breathtaking force, showcased perfectly in this immense frenetic remix by fellow Brighton faves Sit Down.(ML)

Notelle – ‘Alive’
Self-described as “nightmare pop”, Nashville-based Notelle blends hushed vocals, warped beats, and seething synth textures to create her claustrophobic sounds. Based on her own experiences of toxic relationships and gas-lighting, ‘Alive’ is Notelle’s most personal release to date. (KC)

Stainwasher – ‘Chems’
Swedish artist Stainwasher is not one to shy away from darker states of emotion. With ‘Chems’, she’s crafted another dark, alluring lullaby that broods with bittersweet anxiety. (KC)

Lorana – ‘Am I’ 
‘Am I?’ is the latest single from self-produced artist Lorana, who sings about her love for music and questions if this love is too big. Her upcoming EP, Here In Between, was written after leaving her small Belgian hometown of Alken for the big London city. In order to reflect this lyrical narrative into her sonic identity, she recorded samples both at home and in London, which are woven throughout all the songs. ‘Am I?’ is a truly touching and beautiful offering, which is a pleasure to listen to as the vocals and samples pour in and out of your ears. (TW)

GEISTE – ‘Moonchild’ 
‘Moonchild’ is the fourth single leading up to GEISTE’s debut EP, Utopia, released on 22nd May. This is a track that hits you with its fullest force. It’s such a an empowering listen, building and building with the tribal drums and feverish samples before colliding into the chorus. ‘Moonchild’ is about not feeling like you fit with people and finding your crowd of misfits, stronger and wilder people that are not defeated by life – which is certainly relatable right now. (TW)

Anna Leone – ‘Wondering’ (TW)
‘Wondering’ is the first release from Anna Leone in two years, and it was definitely worth the wait. Slow and intense, she draws you into her world with such raw emotion, that you’re left feeling as though you’ve had a personal invitation into her thoughts.

Speaking about the new track, Anna says: “I’ve been going back and forth recently trying to decide whether I should start releasing new songs. My music is very much about isolation and being disconnected, and I’ve been kind of questioning if that‘s the energy I should put out into the world right now. I think ultimately though, the songs are also about healing, and I can only hope that that’s what people take away from them. I’ve been dealing with depression and anxiety for a long time and this album is sort of the culmination of all those feelings. I still can’t listen to it all the way through without crying, which is painful but also a good thing, I think. It feels cathartic.” It’s so important that we hear music like this right now, remembering it’s ok to not be ok, but more importantly that we are not alone.

Listen to, and follow, the full playlist here:

GIHE Tracks Of 2019

It’s that time of year again when we look back at some of our musical highlights. And what a year for new music it’s been – from empowering guitar-driven anthems and gritty electro beats, to dreamy indie-pop, our ears have been pretty lucky!

Over the next week, we’ll be sharing our favourite gigs, albums, events and Ones To Watch for 2020, but for now, here are our top tracks of 2019. Have a read, and a listen!

Clt Drp – ‘Speak To My’
Having completely blown us away live at The Finsbury in June, Brighton trio Clt Drp are one of the most exciting bands I’ve come across this year. With the immense, thrashing beats, fuzz-filled whirring hooks and soaring, gritty vocals of ‘Speak To My’, the empowered energy of their unique electro-punk sound is showcased perfectly. (Mari Lane – Co-Founder/Managing Editor)

Scrounge – ‘Badoom’
Savage guitar riffs and driving beats form the basis for South London duo Scrounge’s single ‘Badoom’. Taken from their debut EP Ideal, released via Fierce Panda, the track showcases the band’s ability to take relatable concepts such as feeling burned out, and turn them in to punchy, cathartic sounds. Check out the karaoke inspired visuals that accompany the track here. (Kate Crudgington – Co-Founder/Features Editor)

ILL – ‘Kick Him Out The Disco’
We’re all in agreement at GIHE that ILL’s track ‘Kick Him Out The Disco’ is a BANGER! These grrrls blend the best bits of punk, noise, and keys to create cathartic anthems about standing up for yourself, and not letting the bastards grind you down. ‘Kick Him Out The Disco’ is a “glittered middle finger” to anyone who’s tried to manipulate you, or who made you question your self-worth. (KC)

Lizzo – ‘Juice’
Bam! As soon as this piece of pure pop magic hit the radio, it got my attention. ‘Juice’ is perfectly constructed; its opening bars draw you in, and before you know it, you’re shouting along and belting out the ‘ya-ya’ chorus. I defy you to listen to this song and stay still. If you’re not running to – or already on – a packed dancefloor, you’ll be shimmying in your seat. It’s sunny, fun and so empowering. ‘Juice’ was my introduction to Lizzo and my love affair with her has blossomed throughout 2019. Her beautiful album artwork, fabulous statement outfits (two words: finger handbag!), and that Glasto performance sealed the deal. My four-year-old sometimes likes to sing along to ‘Juice’ in the car, thankfully neglecting the naughty words. When he does, it reminds me how lucky we are to have a popstar like Lizzo. Body positive, funny, filthy. She’s an inspiration.
(Vic Conway – Contributor)

God Colony (feat. Samirah Raheem) – ‘Girls’
You might recognise Samira Raheem from her 2 minute interview at Amber Rose’s Slutwalk in 2018. This video caught the attention of UK Producers God Colony, who approached Raheem to collaborate. The result of that collaboration is ‘Girls’ – an encouraging call-to-arms laced with fierce lyrics, and indutrial-tinged, progressive beats. Always remember: “Every dog has his day / and bad bitches too”. (KC)

Pallas Athene – ‘Through Hell’
One of my absolute favourite songs of the year, ‘Through Hell’ is taken from Pallas Athene’s debut self-titled EP. Exploring themes of man vs machine and the dissolution of self, this is the latest single from the EP which I’m so into – I just love its spaced out vocals and calming chords. Keep up the great work! Looking forward to the future of Pallas Athene.
(Tash Walker – Co-Founder/Digital Editor)

Grizzly Coast – ‘High Functioning’
A GIHE team favourite, ‘High Functioning’ by Grizzly Coast is a track that has got firmly into my head. It’s all about holding your life together in every place, but your own head. Of the track, Grizzly Coast explains: “I was going through a difficult time with my OCD choosing to power forward and work towards my goals”, but she found the purpose and drive to stay confident through it all, and we are very thankful for that. ‘High Functioning’ is a total tune, keep up the great work Grizzly Coast, we’re behind you 100%! (TW)

Amahla – ‘Dorothy’s Verses’
Having played legendary venues such as The Jazz Cafe and The Roundhouse, and garnered support from the likes of BBC Radio 1 Extra and 6Music’s Tom Robinson, Hackney native Amahla this year released the poignant ‘Dorothy’s Verses’. Exploring what truth is through the story of her grandmother, and reflecting on the power of female voices, ‘Dorothy’s Verses’ flow with rich, impassioned vocals alongside luscious sweeping hooks, creating a truly spellbinding – and deeply stirring – offering. (ML)

Grimes – ‘Violence’
It’s funny, looking back at 2019, I could swear this song has been out longer than a mere three months. Grimes has always been a bit beyond me up to now: too saccharine for my artsy side, too much of an art angel for my pop tastes, but ‘Violence’ hits the sweet spot. Haunting beats, an insistent hook and candied vocals that bitterly talk of a romance that’s damaging, controlling but satisfying. With 2019’s batshit political and cultural wars veering between poles, ‘Violence’ pins it all to the floor.
(John McGovern – Contributor)

Catbear – ‘Unrequited Love’
‘Unrequited Love’ is the second single from Catbear, and what a tune! Fully home-recorded, self-produced, and with a heavy helping of synths. In their own words Catbear say: “We make music for the enjoyment of it. We are two good friends that love each other and we love making music together. There is no other agenda. And with that attitude we want to inspire young women and LGBTQ people like us to not only go form a band, but to take control over every aspect of their music. You can be a guitarist, you can be a drummer. You can make beats, you can record and produce your own music. You can be anything.” (TW)

BEA1991 – ‘Loser Wins’
Amsterdam-based artist and musical polymath BEA1991 swept me away with this track, taken from her debut album Brand New Adult. I love her subtle, soaring vocals and there’s a beautiful accompanying video to this track that I recommend you check out too. (KC)

Sui Zhen – ‘Perfect Place’
Despite having now released three albums, I only heard Sui Zhen for the first time this year. And it was love at first listen. Inspired by how we exist in the digital age, ‘Perfect Place’ flows with glitchy beats and twinkling, ‘80s-inspired hooks alongside Sui Zhen’s quirky, honey-sweet vocals. An instantly infectious slice of sparkling alt-pop that I haven’t been able to stop listening to. The whole album, Losing, Linda, is pretty magical. (ML)

Despicable Zee – ‘Counting Cars’
Despicable Zee is an Oxford based musician, composer and performer. I am so very into this track of hers, ‘Counting Cars’. I cannot get enough of the samples and composition – so so good! Despicable Zee aka Zahra is also the director of the Young Women’s Music Project working alongside and guiding young female musicians. Her third EP, Atigheh, is self-produced and independently released, check it out now. (TW)

The Big Moon – ‘Your Light’
The Big Moon proved they’re as talented on two wheels as they are on two feet in the accompanying video to their superb single ‘Your Light’. With its catchy chorus, buoyant melodies and feel-good lyrics, it’s the perfect boost for anyone who’s feeling blue about the current state of affairs. The song is lifted from their upcoming sophomore album Walking Like We Do, which is set for release on 10th January 2020 via Fiction Records. (KC)

Captain Handsome – ‘I Wish I Had A Dog’
Having been a pretty massive fan of indie-pop superstars Fightmilk for a couple of years now, I was excited when Lily from the band shared the first single from her new solo project, Captain Handsome. A poignant exploration of every-day anxieties, ‘I Wish I Had A Dog’ showcases Lily’s distinctive silky-smooth-yet-gritty vocals whilst oozing a touching raw emotion. With a twinkling lo-fi scuzz alongside the sensitivity of Lily’s refreshingly honest and consistently relatable lyricism, it’s a slice of effervescent indie-pop that tugs at the heartstrings in all the right ways. I can’t wait to hear more from Captain Handsome in 2020. (ML)

You can listen to all our favourite tracks now, in this handy playlist! We’ll be adding to the playlist as we share our other end of year features – keep your eyes/ears peeled!

 

 

Mari Lane / @marimindles
Kate Crudgington / @kcbobcut
Tash Walker / @maudeandtrevor
Vic Conway

John McGovern / @etinsuburbiaego

Get In Her Ears @ Notting Hill Arts Club w/ ESYA 30.11.19

Get In Her Ears returned to Notting Hill Arts Club to host another evening of alternative music, headlined by the multi-talented ESYA (Ayse Hassan of Savages/Kite Base/180 db). South London duo Scrounge shared the bill, as we as spoken word artist & drummer Eilis Frawley.

The task of opening the night fell to Berlin-based Eilis, who delivered her unique cacophony of live drums, electronic elements and spoken-word lyrics with captivating precision. Performing singles ‘Strangers’ and ‘Illusions’ (both championed by Radio X’s John Kennedy, who was in attendance), her one woman show felt all the more powerful, as many of her songs are informed by feminist beliefs that align perfectly with GIHE.

Scrounge took to the stage next to perform their savage post-punk noise. Lucy & Luke’s live sets are always a raw, urgent affair; and we felt every beat of tracks ‘Badoom’ and ‘Purpose’. The duo released their EP Ideal, earlier this year, and it’s barely left our ears since. They’re firm favourites of GIHE, and their heavy guitar riffs and knockout drumming sat perfectly between Eilis & ESYA’s sets.

  

Headlining the night and performing her last London show of 2019, ESYA hypnotized us with her dark, brooding electronics. Filled with buzzing synth textures, direct vocals and pummeling beats; her songs flesh out the absurdities of our relationships and interactions with each other. Set highlights included ‘Nothing’, ‘Everything’, and brand new single ‘Blue Orchid’, lifted from her recent EP, Absurdity of ATCG (II) – Emergent Form. She multi-tasks triggering synths, performing  vocals, and plucking bass strings throughout the set, and she’s met with deserved cheers and applause at the end of the show.

Huge thanks to the sound engineer and staff at Notting Hill Arts Club.

Follow the bands on Facebook for more updates: ESYA, Scrounge, Eilis Frawley.

Photo Credit: Jon Mo

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut