LISTEN: GIHE on Soho Radio with DEWEY 18.11.22

Tash was back on Soho Radio’s airwaves playing loads of new music from an eclectic mix of female, non-binary and LGBTQIA+ artists, with tracks picked by fellow GIHE pals Kate and Mari too.

Co-host India Latham also joined Tash live in the studio to discuss the recent gigs of Okay Kaya, Julia Jacklin, Tempers, Curses and Double Helix. India also revealed that the first album she bought was by Ronan Keating, and that she used to co-host Brighton Hospital’s radio show back in the day – life truly is a rollercoaster, just gotta ride it.

Tash spoke to new music artist DEWEY about the inspiration behind their recent release ‘Another Woman’, accepting and processing emotional and physical pain, as well as conversations about the power of electricity, pylons and connection within their music. Music highlights include Priya Ragu, Big Joanie, Etella, LibraLibra, Dayydream, Human Interest, STAINWASHER, Jadu Heart, HOLDA SEK and more.

Listen back below:

 

Make sure you tune into Soho Radio on Wednesday 14th of December for the final Get In Her Ears show of 2022!

Tracklist
Big Joanie – Sainted
Andrew Bird & Phoebe Bridgers – I Felt A Funeral In My Brain
Okay Kaya – Dance Like U
Julia Jacklin – Body
Jadu Heart – I Shimmer
Ideal Host – The Conflict
Dawn Richard and Spencer Zahn – Crimson
STAINWASHER – I Hate Backpackers
Tempers – Unfamiliar
Miss Grit – Follow The Cyborg
Priya Ragu – Santhosam
Babyfather, Tirzah – 1471
Moonchild Sanelly – Demon
HOLDA SEK – At Twenty
DOUBLE HELIX – Rat Rave
The Pearl Harts – More
DEWEY – Another Woman
**Interview with DEWEY**
Export Import – On Scene
Midwife – I Don’t Want To Love
Etella – Nomad
Dayydream – Wasn’t
Human Interest – Mixing Paint
Queen Colobus – 5/9
LibraLibra – Frenemies
Panic Shack – Meal Deal
Sweet Harmony – Liquid

GUIDE & PLAYLIST: Supersonic Festival

Event: Supersonic Festival

Where: Digbeth, Birmingham (The Mill, 29 Lower Trinity St, Deritend, Birmingham B9 4AG)

When: Friday 8th – Sunday 10th July 2022

Ticket Info: Full Weekend ticket: £130 / 2 Day Weekend ticket: £100.00 / Day ticket: £50 (ticket link here)

General Info: Now celebrating its 16th year, Supersonic Festival have put together another “ambitious programme of mind bending music, sense shifting art and life altering experiences” with their 2022 Guest Curators Decolonise Fest and Radwan Moumneh. There will also be extracurricular talks, screenings and activities across the weekend, including Do.om Yoga and an exhibition on the power of DIY printing.

Who’s Playing: Full line-up & timetable here

Divide & Dissolve, Rachel Aggs, Grove, BUNUEL, Bloody Head, Blue Ruth, Bismuth, A.A. Williams, Follakzoid, J. Zunz, No Home, Nadja, June Of 44, Richard Dawson & Circle, Old Man Gloom, Thou, The Bug ft. Flowdan, Jerusalem In My Heart, Radwan Moumneh, Aabronia, BINT7ALAL, Big Brave, DJ Awkward Black Girl, Farida Amadou, Matters, Jessika Khazrik + Nurah Farahat, PRNCSS, Shovel Dance Collective, Holy Tongue, Paul Purgas, Erin Weisgerber, Pharaoh Overlord + Aaron Tuner and more!

Who GIHE recommend you catch: We’re already big fans of the the heavy sounds of No Home (Saturday, The Mill, 16:30), the beautiful noise of A.A. Williams (Sunday, The Mill, 15:50), and the gargantuan grace of Divide & Dissolve (Sunday, 7SVN, 21:30) so we recommend you catch each of their sets. Grove (Friday, 7SVN, 22:30), Rachel Aggs (Saturday, The Mill, 17:30) and J.Zunz (Sunday, 7SVN, 16:50) are well worth your attention too!

We recommend attending The Art Of Collaboration talk (Sunday, Centrala Upstairs, 13:10), which will feature conversations between interdisciplinary artist, producer and DJ Jessika Khazrik, producer & composer Elizabeth Bernholz aka Gazelle Twin and NYX choir Director Sian O’Gorman.

Decolonise Fest will also be hosting a talk (Saturday, Market Place Stage, 18:40) and playing a DJ set afterwards – both will be great!

For more information on the festival visit their official website

Check out our Supersonic Festival Playlist below!

LIVE: Women’s Work Showcase 2022 – Oh Yeah Music Centre, Belfast

A community led, human-centered approach to promoting and supporting women & non-binary people in music, the Women’s Work Showcase at Belfast’s Oh Yeah Music Centre was stacked with impressive live performances over the Jubilee Bank Holiday weekend. Full of passionate, respectful fans and artists who all contributed to making the space feel as vibrant and as safe as possible, the showcase displayed the eclectic and exciting musical talent of the Northern Irish & Irish music scenes.

As we walked into the venue to the sound of Girl For Sale‘s tender guitar tunes, we recognised so many faces both on and off stage. HAVVK, Party Fears and Problem Patterns were all amongst the crowd, who cheered as self-described “pink pop princess” Susi Pagel performed her bittersweet anthems ‘Pick Me’, ‘Pretty Girl’ and also treated listeners to a cover of Avril Lavigne’s ‘Complicated’, as a nod to the 20th anniversary of the Canadian superstar’s debut album, Let Go.

Split across two stages, we turned to see Clara Tracey clad in a white suit seated behind her keyboard, as she delivered a captivating set filled with her clear, soft vocals and jazz-tinged keys. The sharp, infectious sounds of rapper Don Chi filled the venue next. Though she confessed to feeling nervous between songs, Don Chi continued to emcee with impressive confidence, with tracks ‘Orange’, ‘Angry’ and ‘Dent’ especially leaving a mark on the memory.

Up next were formidable Dublin four-piece SPRINTS. Tearing through a riotous set list that included songs from their recent EP A Modern Job, the band had the crowd hanging on every riff and chorus, with vocalist & guitarist Karla Chubb commanding their attention with truly furious flair. The infectious, radiant alt-pop tunes of Winnie Ama followed, filling the venue with joy and swaying bodies to tracks ‘Here I Go’ and ‘Awe Of You’.

Aoife Wolf brought her brooding “Noise folk from the bog” to everyone’s ears next. Armed with her guitar and enigmatic vocals, the effect of her subtle, yet captivating performance lingered long after she’d stopped playing. GIHE favourites Fraulein took to the stage afterwards, bringing their moody brand of alternative grunge to an attentive crowd. Joni & Karston’s natural charisma made their performance feel effortless, with tracks ‘And I Go (La La La)’ and ‘Belly’ sounding bigger and better each time we hear them. Derry trio CHERYM brought their brand of infectious pop punk inspired tunes next, smiling from ear-to-ear as they did so. ‘Abigail’, ‘We’re Just Friends’ and ‘Listening to my Head’ all stood out amongst a setlist full of energetic guitar anthems that went by in a flash of glee and angst.

Closing the night were feminist punks Problem Patterns. Kicking off their set with ‘Y.A.W’ (‘Yes All Women’), Alanah, Beth, Bev and Ciara firmly established their status as one of the most important and powerful live bands of the moment. Challenging the traditional “front person” set up by having each band member switch between mics and instruments for different songs, their set was full of jokes, joy and rage: all shared and directed at the patriarchal forces that attempt to crush minority communities who are asking for the respect they deserve. ‘Terfs Out’ the gloriously abrasive ‘Big Shouty’ and the wonderful ‘Gal Pals’ all resonated with the enthusiastic crowd.

Despite many artists and fans having to leave the venue earlier than planned due to public transport issues (which Oh Yeah Music Centre’s Charlotte Dryden highlighted in this tweet), the Women’s Work Showcase felt like a truly progressive initiative that proved that safe spaces for women & non-binary artists and fans are vital, and something that can be implemented into the wider music scenes if people are willing to put in the effort.

All that’s left to say is a huge thank you to the staff at the Oh Yeah Centre, the patient and attentive sound engineers, and to Charlene Hegarty, who curated the line-up and invited us over to share in the joy of Women’s Work.

Follow Women’s Work on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram & on their official website

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

An Open Letter To First Timers Fest…

Dear First Timers Fest,

Thank you for existing and for the best Sunday afternoon spent at the Amersham Arms, watching new bands perform live together for the first time.

I (and the GIHE team) have been following your work as a non-profit organisation, encouraging people from all walks of life to start making music for a while now and I think what you do is vital and beautiful – and I hope you feel appreciated!

For those who don’t know, First Timers are a London based initiative who run workshops and festivals that aim to make music accessible to all. They focus on creating fun, low pressure environments for people to learn instruments, form their own band and aim to build a community of like-minded people who think access to music shouldn’t be blocked by financial or social barriers.

I have seen and felt the joy of the First Timers community first hand, having attended their Bass Workshop with Jodi earlier this year and their Festival earlier this month. Turning up alone to these events can feet a bit daunting, but from the moment I walked into an event, the team of volunteers were warm, approachable and always willing to chat. It’s a human-centered initiative designed to make you feel comfortable, and it’s always a pleasure to be in the room with other people who are seeking a connection through music.

Between sets at the festival, I spoke to volunteers and organisers about how much I was enjoying the day. They took the time to stand and talk with me, which was no small feat considering that logistically, organising stage times and supporting 15 new bands must have meant they had a truly chaotic day. My only regret is that I couldn’t stay for the full festival!

It was inspiring to watch new bands like Wormdriver, Poorly Trained Radicals, Pig City, Egg Doggs and Achers share their music with a crowd for the first time. Considering it was a festival for beginners, there were so few “mistakes” in the performances, and if any person on stage looked like they were unsure, the crowd immediately applauded or cheered them on to dissolve the uncertainty. It’s this shared supportive attitude that makes First Timers Fest such a pleasure to witness. It’s an attitude that often gets lost in the pretensions of wider, more “serious” music spheres. It’s easy to forget that everyone has to start somewhere and ultimately – so what if you fuck it up? That’s half the fun anyway, and that’s what First Timers are here for.

I grew up as a working class girl in Essex and despite secretly wanting to, I never learned how to play an instrument. I was one of four kids, incredibly shy and had no idea where to start. My brother taught himself how to play guitar and synths via Youtube videos, but I couldn’t grasp any of it through a screen. The one bass lesson I had with Jodi this year made me feel like I might actually be able to get somewhere with an instrument, if I just make the time to practice it more often. If First Timers had been around when I was a teenager, I think they would have helped me get to where I am today a little bit quicker. I’m grateful to have found them now as an adult, and I really hope others will read this and reach out and join the First Timers community too.

Keep up the good work folks and I’ll see you again soon.

Love & solidarity,
Kate x

 

Follow First Timers Fest on TwitterFacebookInstagram & their official website

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut