LISTEN: Fe Salomon – ‘Super Human’ and ‘Wired On Caffeine’

A rousing alt-pop tune that shimmers with self-belief, songwriter Fe Salomon has shared her latest single ‘Super Human’. Co-written with composer and long-term collaborator Johnny Parry, the track embraces the binary opposites of the human condition via playful beats, jazzy arrangements and Salomon’s smooth vocals.

Taken form her debut album Living Rooms, which is set for release later this year, Salomon has channelled her love of performing and her eclectic range of influences into her new records, which aims to tell the stories of “multiple lives lived and lost in the city, of friendships that meant everything and the characters you’ll never meet again, of transience and loneliness, and of getting by and moving on.”

‘Super Human’ is the first offering from her new material, and it’s an exploration of the power of the alter ego. “‘Super Human’ originated with dancing around with some upper body shimmy moves,” Salomon explains, “then a chunky brass section, dirty synth and disjunctive rhythms, all inspired by a number 70’s and 80’s movie soundtracks.” Accompanied by a cinematic video directed by Fraser Taylor, the visuals show Salomon performing the shimmy shakes that inspired the track’s conception.

The single is also accompanied by a bonus track ‘Wired On Caffeine‘ which showcases Salomon’s shadowy alt-pop side. Stepping into the shoes of an artist sacked from a job before it even began, Salomon remarks: “The chaos became very still and the seed of a new journey popped out its first green shoots of hope. Finding yourself is sometimes just a question of optics. ‘Wired on Caffeine’ is what happened when I looked through that lens.”

Watch the video for ‘Super Human’ below and listen to ‘Wired On Caffeine’ here.

 

Follow Fe Salomon on bandcamp, Spotify, Facebook & Instagram

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

PLAYLIST: January 2022

New year, new playlist! The Get In Her Ears team have put together an eclectic mix of indie anthems, guitar tunes, alt-pop tracks & immersive electronic sounds for your listening pleasure. Take some time to scroll through our track choices below and make sure you hit play on the Spotify playlist at the end of this post.

Follow GIHE on Spotify to hear all of our previous playlists too.

Ronnie Spector – ‘She Talks To Rainbows’
Hearing news of Ronnie Spector’s passing last week hit hard. A truly innovative musical icon, she inspired generations of women in music, whilst The Ronnettes were one of the first ‘girl groups’ to receive worldwide acclaim. Sadly also famous for being a survivor of serious physical and psychological abuse from her husband of six years, producer Phil Spector, I think it’s important we remember Ronnie for the incredible musical gifts she’s left us with. I just love the sparkling, soulful splendour and whimsical grace of this lesser known beauty, ‘She Talks To Rainbows’. (Mari Lane)

Girl Ray – ‘Murder on the Dance Floor’
Girl Ray’s cover of this 2001 classic by Sophie Ellis-Bextor… Need. I. Say. More. (Tash Walker)

Bas Jan – ‘Sex Cult’
The latest single from London experimental collective Bas Jan (founded by Serafina Steer and featuring members of Jenny Moore’s Mystic Business and Jarv Is), ‘Sex Cult’ offers a glistening cacophony propelled by a quirky energy and captivating allure. Reflecting on society’s attitude towards polygamy, it radiates a celestial joy as crystalline voices come together in unity to create something quite euphoric. Baby You Know, the new album from Bas Jan, is out 28th January via Lost Map Records. (ML)

ML Buch – ‘I’m a Girl You can Hold IRL’
This song is taken from Danish electro-pop musician ML Buch’s album Skinned which came out in 2020, but I spent a lot of the winter break listening to it so thought I’d share it with you all in 2022. I love its futuristic techno electro tones and all the FEELINGS. (TW)

SEA CHANGE – ‘Is There Anybody There’
Created during a time of intense loneliness during the middle of lockdown, this atmospheric offering from Norwegian producer Sea Change gives me goosebumps. Blossoming from a place of empathy, it’s one of many evocative tunes that feature on her upcoming album, Mutual Dreaming, which is set for release on 11th February via Shapes Recordings. (Kate Crudgington)

Brimheim – ‘This Week’s Laundry’
A stirring, intricately observed guitar tune about trying to cultivate a “normal” routine during a time of deep vulnerability, I love this single from Danish alt-pop artist Brimheim. Taken from her upcoming album, can’t hate myself into a different shape, which is set for release on 28th January via W.A.S Entertainment, the track flows with her tender vocals and confessional lyrics, which chime with relatable melancholy. I had the pleasure of interviewing Brimheim about her new record and her love for Queen Avril Lavigne earlier this month. Read our chat here. (KC)

Midwife – ‘2020’
This is a gloomy (but great) track about the year we’d all rather forget: 2020. Taken from Midwife aka Madeline Johnston’s third album Luminol, which was written & produced during quarantine last year, ‘2020’ is her cover of The Offspring’s 1997 track ‘Gone Away’, which I didn’t know until the person who recommended Midwife to me sent me a link to the original song. I know she’s been around a while, but I’m newly obsessed with this track & her album.  (KC)

Wu-Lu – ‘Times’
My new obsession, I recently came across South London multi-instrumentalist and producer Wu-Lu courtesy of Mary-Anne Hobbs on BBC 6Music. Creating a wonderfully eclectic smorgasbord of immense sounds, I just love how Wu-Lu manages to fuse together dark, Deftones-esque punk with a gritty, hip-hop inspired edge. I cannot stop listening to this track right now, which features drums by Black Midi’s Morgan Simpson. (ML)

Pearly – ‘Silver Behind The Mirror’
An agitated, sultry dose of cinematic heavy rock, I’m a big fan of this single by Ohio-based trio Pearly. Taken from their upcoming album Silver of The Mirror, which is set for release on 11th February via Eto Ano Recordings, the track is a smouldering slice of “stoner rock” that heaves with heady desire. (KC)

SASAMI – ‘Say It’
This industrial-tinged “rage dance anthem” from SASAMI is 100% a bit of me. Taken from her upcoming album Squeeze, which is set for release on 25th February via Domino, SASAMI explains: “I feel like when I hear this song I see a hot femme with a mystical flamethrower engulfed in emotional blue flames throwing elbows alone in an industrial dance club in outer space.” Mate, same. (KC)

HALINA RICE – ‘Sunken Suns’
What do I love more than dreamy songs full of feelings? The answer is obscure electronica! My latest listen comes from London-based artist Halina Rice, as part of a new project where she is embarking on creating new worlds in her music. Of this track Halina explains, “I wanted to create something dark and strange and emotive. The track emerged after days spent generating sounds through synths and noise generators. I put a mass of effects on the sampled vocals and they seemed to develop a life of their own – like a half-heard transmission from another world.” LOVE IT. (TW)

Gemini Aaliyah – ‘Moonrise’
Leeds-based artist Gemini Aaliyah says her single ‘Moonrise’ is the beginning of her “fucked up fairy tale where the ghetto meets the goth girl,” and that’s something I’d like to openly support. She channels her angst through yearning vocals and brooding beats, finding solace in the idea of re-birth and reinvention through her lyrics. Gemini Aaliyah will be playing at Drown U Out Festival at Leeds University Union on 19th February, alongside two of my other favourites Ho99o9 and Bob Vylan. (KC)

Queen Cult – ‘Calm’
Following acclaim from the likes of BBC Introducing for their debut single ‘Shindigger’ and support for their resonant latest single ‘A Song About Consent’, Queen Cult’s latest single ‘Calm’ flows with luscious, heartfelt vocals before building to a sweeping, fiercely impassioned proclamation to stand up to the patriarchy. Once again showcasing the Cheshire band’s knack for creating epic pop-rock anthems with a poignant sense of intent, ‘Calm’ cements Queen Cult’s place as definite ones to watch in 2022. The debut EP from Queen Cult is set for release on 28th January. (ML)

Peaness – ‘How I’m Feeling’
Having just announced the release of their debut album, Chester trio Peaness have shared a new taster of what’s to come from the LP. Propelled by uplifting, jangling hooks, latest single ‘How I’m Feeling’ reflects on the feelings of self-loathing and melancholy that can come from being stuck in an unfulfilling job and offers a glistening sense of hope that, with a bit of determination, you can make a positive change. I just can’t get enough of Peaness’ glossy, honey-sweet sounds and sunny, playful energy. World Full Of Worry, the debut album from Peaness, is set for release on 6th May. (ML)

SPRINTS – ‘Little Fix’
Another absolute banger from Dublin four-piece Sprints. Taken from their upcoming EP A Modern Job, which is set for release on 11th March via Nice Swan Records, ‘Little Fix’ is full of powerhouse vocals, crashing drums and racing riffs. The track is inspired by vocalist Karla Chubb’s experience of imposter syndrome, as she explains: “plagued by insecurities, imposter syndrome and gender stereotypes, ‘Little Fix’ is the culmination of all my fears – the, sometimes self-applied pressure that as a woman in music, I can’t just be good, I have to be great.” Even with these anxieties, Karla and her bandmates have created a candid, intensely cathartic offering with this track. (KC)

Worse Off – ‘You Belong Here’
I love this track by excellently named New York pop punk duo Worse Off. They sent me their EP You Win Some, You Lose…A Lot, in December last year and I was headbanging away to their tunes at my desk. Definitely check them out, their EP is up on bandcamp and Spotify. (KC)

Tits Up – ‘Macho Bullshit’
Having released their debut EP Greatest Tits, at the beginning of the month, Liverpool band Tits Up are ready to blast into your lives with their immense riot grrrl inspired energy and unapologetic honesty raging against the patriarchal society in which we live. Fuelled by a frenzied punk spirit, ‘Macho Bullshit’ hits you with its riotous, angst-driven force, offering an empowering statement of intent. (ML)

Bitch – ‘You’re The Man’
Set to release her debut album next month, queer electro-pop artist Bitch prides herself on being “like Joni Mitchell set to a click track… It’s neon pink, in your face, ready to hex you with its brilliance.” Latest single ‘You’re The Man’ exudes a driving, gritty energy as sizzling synths race alongside dense drum-machine beats, creating an empowering reflection on letting go of negative forces and reclaiming your inner voice. Bitch’s perfectly named debut album Bitchcraft is set for release on 4th February via legendary label Kill Rock Stars. (ML)

Combo Chimbita – ‘Yo Me Lo Merezco’
The title of this warm, joyful track from New York-based Latinx quartet Combo Chimbita roughly translates as “I deserve it”. The track and accompanying video are a celebration of self-love, spot-lighting prominent queer and trans performance artists, including Teresa Karolina who stars in the visuals. ‘Yo Me Lo Merezco’ is taken from Combo Chimbita’s upcoming album, IRE, which is set for release on 28th January via ANTI. (KC)

Flamango Bay – ‘LA’
The latest single from San Francisco trio Flamango Bay, ‘LA’ reflects on the band’s recent move to the city. Propelled by sunny, jangling melodies, it’s a dreamy slice of indie-pop that glistens with an irresistible, effervescent charm. The Fool, the upcoming debut EP from Flamango Bay, is set for release on 13th May via 0800-Moshi-Moshi. (ML)

Babeheaven – ‘Don’t Wake Me
This band never disappoint. ‘Don’t Wake Me’ is Babeheaven’s latest gently soothing release. Just lovely. (TW)

KEYAH/BLU – ‘Til Bliss’
This is the latest single by South London rapper KEYAH/BLU who I would encourage you all to go and check out if you aren’t familiar with already. (TW)

Skylu – ‘Foreign Concept’
A tune for the stolen hours, this is the debut single from Skylu, whose voice you may recognise from Bamboo Smoke. (TW)

Lucy Barton – ‘Starlight’
The latest single from singer-songwriter Lucy Barton, ‘Starlight’ offers a sparkling reflection on gaining awareness of our self-crippling subconscious thoughts. With a subtle immersive power, the track speaks of breaking free from this internal narration, allowing us to discover the beauty that exists in life. I’m a big fan of Barton’s soaring, glitchy musicality and emotion-strewn honey-sweet vocals, and can’t wait to hear more from her. (ML)

Carmel Smickersgill – ‘Questioning’
The latest single from modern classical artist Carmel Smickersgill, ‘Questioning’ offers a truly captivating and uniquely intriguing soundscape. Mentored by acclaimed musician Anna Meredith, Smickersgill prides herself on creating immersive ‘outsider pop’, and I just love this track’s whirring grace and celestial, ethereal energy, reminiscent of GIHE fave Jenny Hval. Smickersgill is releasing her debut EP in April. (ML)

Novaa – ‘You Can F With Me’
‘You Can F With Me’ by Berlin based alt-pop singer-songwriter Novaa is taken from her forthcoming album due in early 2022. This is a song about the things that people asked and told her as a victim of sexual abuse and rape. Love and solidarity to anyone who relates to that track and remember that the best thing you can ever do for anyone who has been a victim, is to listen, be kind and give them space and support to heal. (TW)

Zannie – ‘Mechanical Bull’
This is the latest single from New York-based songwriter Zannie, who’s recently signed to iconic riot grrrl label Kill Rock Stars. They remind me a little bit of Phoebe Bridgers on this track and I’m excited to hear more from them this year. (KC)

INTERVIEW: Brimheim

“I am going to be completely honest with you” sings Danish artist Brimheim on the opening to her exquisitely tender track ‘favorite day of the week‘. It’s a simple enough statement, but she delivers it with startling conviction via crystalline vocals and her considered instrumentation. It’s this combined candid and tentative approach that makes listening to her debut album, can’t hate myself into a different shape, such a cathartic and rewarding experience. Set for release on the 28th January, and the follow up to her 2020 EP, Myself Misspelled, it’s a poignant reflection on love in all its forms; romantic, platonic and perhaps the hardest love to articulate: self love.

Brimheim – a name chosen as a homage to her roots in the Faroe Islands, translating as “home of the breaking waves” – worked alongside producer Søren Buhl Lassen to create the sublime sounds on her new record, which blossomed from a place of deep personal pain during a global pandemic. Despite the raw and confessional aesthetic of her music, when I meet her via Zoom she is in good spirits, laughing throughout the interview at her own Aquarian personality traits and willingly fan-girling over Avril Lavigne with me. We speak about her musical origins, her favourite tracks on her upcoming record, and what it’s like to transform moments of darkness into pure and palpable joy…

 

A good place to start would be with your first memories of music, can you remember who or what first inspired you to start making your own music?

Sure, my mum is a musician and she had a home recording studio in the apartment I grew up in, so ever since I was little I’ve been singing and writing little children’s songs of my own. But it wasn’t until I discovered our queen Avril Lavigne when I was 12 years old, when I saw the ‘Complicated’ music video on a Danish music TV programme that I was like, “oh my god, is this allowed? Is this a way to be?”

She was on a skateboard and she was playing the guitar, goofing around with her friends who were all boys. It was one of those “I’m not like the other girls” bullshit moments, you know? – but as a young girl, that spoke to me. That was kind of my gateway drug into thinking a little bit more about how I could do music, how could I do that and make it my own. I have diary entries from the time where I was like, “I want to go to New York City and become a big rock star!”

My Mum has always been incredibly supportive. She bought a guitar for me and I learned three chords and then I was like, “Okay, that’s all I need, I don’t want to like practice this crap, I just want to write songs and stand on that stage already!” So yeah, that’s kind of how it happened.

I love this and I absolutely love Avril Lavigne too. I was also about 12 years old when her debut album came out. I never got to see her live when I was a teenager, but I’ve got tickets to see her this year in London and I feel like I’m going to cry the whole way through. I’m going to be a 31 year old woman crying in the crowd…

I love that. I’m sure there will be many like minded people right alongside of you, crying the whole way through.

I hope so. Your video for your single ‘hey amanda’ is quite Avril Lavigne-esque. When I first saw it I was concentrating on the fact that you have two members of Baby In Vain in the band with you, but now you’ve mentioned Avril, the video makes so much more sense to me. Tell me all about it…

Totally, that was definitely an inspiration. It was so fun to film because usually I’m a solo act, so most of the stuff that I do with press and with music videos is all just me. I was really stoked that they (Baby In Vain) were in it, they’re my live band and my dear friends, so when I asked ask them “would you be up for just goofing around and having a good time on camera?” they were up for it. Usually I don’t get to do that with people.

The video for my other single ‘poison fizzing on a tongue’ is a lot more ambitious and probably more my vibe, but I wanted to do something that was light and that showcased the other end of the spectrum with ‘hey amanda’. I don’t want to really lock myself into “everything needs to be dark and gothy,” I’d like to be able to to express all of those different things. And some things can just be for shits and giggs!

Absolutely. You wrote ‘hey amanda’ as an ode to your friend and a celebration of platonic love. How did Amanda react when she first heard the song?

Amanda moved to Montreal five or six years ago, so we don’t get to see each other as often as we’d like. We call each other often and we send stuff back and forth so we have a long distance friendship. I’d sent her the the initial demo of the song and I didn’t get a reply.

I just spiralled. I was like, “oh, no, oh, no, no, what did I do? Did I just totally offend her? Was it too private?” Then I started getting a little annoyed, like, “how can she be offended about this?” already having the argument in my head…but it turns out she just hadn’t seen the attachment. When she heard it she cried. She never really posts anything on social media, but she posted such nice things about it. It was really precious. I’m glad she felt it, because I’m really proud of the song and I mean every word of it.

It’s a great song. Let’s talk about your album as a whole. I absolutely love the title, can’t hate myself into a different shape. I don’t mean to generalise an entire record of songs, but after listening to it, it feels like you’ve transformed experiences of feeling really vulnerable into something that sounds really beautiful and atmospheric.

You explore themes of romantic love, platonic love, and coming to terms with trying to love yourself as well. Was it a cathartic record to write? Because for me, it was definitely a cathartic record to listen to.

First of all, thank you very much. I feel very seen. It was a split experience, I’d say. I was deep in a depression hole in the whole latter part of of 2020, and that’s when I actually kind of launched my career and tried to go pro with this music thing that I had been trying to do my whole life.

I’d had a lot of attention and hype in Denmark and the Faroe Islands especially, way more than I had expected. I was in a really good place with my wife – she’s American and I’m Danish, so we had immigration difficulties – but all of that was kind of landing in nice places and my career was going well. Then, of course, the external factors of a pandemic shutting everything down just made me really fucking depressed. I was struggling a lot and feeling super overwhelmed and unable to cope with my own feelings. This is something that I’ve experienced often in my life, and probably will again, but this was a long stretch of time that it lasted.

I attempted to write songs while I was feeling like shit and had no energy, and it ended up just being very small snippets that I recorded on my phone with my guitar. Small ideas to set the bar for success really, really low for having been creative that day. Then I booked time in the studio with Søren Buhl, who produced the record with me. I hadn’t really worked with him before, I didn’t really know him, so I was nervous about it. I felt like I wasn’t really prepared enough because the things I had were so bare bones and such small ideas. But it turns out that our chemistry and our tastes were super aligned and it was kind of a blessing that the little kernels I had were so open ended, because that made that second part of the process of me and him working together in the studio super cathartic.

I felt like I’d been in this black muddy place, not able to see anything and kind of drowning, and then I slowly started emerging from that through this process of transforming these ideas into arrangements and recorded music with a structure. It was so life affirming. Again, because I am a solo artist, there can be a lot of self doubt and suffering involved! But this was the first time I’ve worked with anybody where it just was easy. So from those little ideas that I brought into the studio, that whole process of transforming them into a finished record took only about eight months, which is like outrageously fast. That makes really excited also to release it, because it still feels super fresh and relevant for me. It took me three years to record and release my debut EP, which is just five songs. But this record just feels really relevant still for me.

Do you have a favourite track on the record? Or does it change all the time?

I think it changes, but I really love the title track which is the second song on the album. For me it sums up what I’m trying to say and I think it was the first song we worked on after we decided we were going to make a record.

I think ‘poison fizzing on a tongue’ might be my favourite track on your new album. I feel like I could listen to it every day and still find something new I haven’t heard before.

Thank you! We made ‘poison’ in the second session in the studio. That was the moment I realised “okay, something really special is going on here.” It kind of came together as it sounds. It just happened in four hours and it sounded like that. I was like, “Oh my God, what just happened? This is amazing!” Especially after I’d been in such a depressive state where I’m like “I’m a piece of shit, everything sucks, I suck” and then being like “this is actually super cool!” that was a good feeling.

That sounds like good affirmation. Do you think that music, whether it’s the music you’re writing or the music you’re listening to, is a good way of understanding or moving past that dark headspace?

For sure. I discovered with this particular round on the depression carousel that I almost didn’t want to listen to music though, because it made me feel stuff. But that also speaks to the power of it, right? I didn’t want to feel anything, or maybe I did? But it felt very vulnerable to feel stuff. Now I’ve discovered that having someone to bounce energy and ideas off of in the studio is incredibly healing.

It sounds like a symbiotic relationship with Søren Buhl?

I can be kind of an Aquarius about things, I can be a little bit closed off to talking about super personal stuff – I do that through my music, that’s where I have my outlet. I can have a little bit of a distance towards people at first, because you know, you don’t want to overwhelm them with your shit! So it was pretty late that I sort of confessed to Søren how very, very special for me and incredibly healing this experience was. I was like “this is one of my favourite things I’ve ever done in my life, you’re one of my favourite people, I don’t know if I’m allowed to say that because we just work together,” but luckily he felt the same, which I was so proud of because he works was with a lot of incredibly talented Danish artists.

What would you say you’re most proud of about this particular record?

I think that I managed to turn off any kind of inner critic. You know, the bad mob inside your head that says “no, it’s not this enough,it’s not that enough…” I was very much just saying yes to whatever ideas felt right. I think that really shines through and I think that it sounds really free. I think that’s what I’m most proud of.

What are your plans for performing the record live in 2022? I know Covid-19 restrictions are different in each country, but talk to me about playing live…

You know, launching a music career in the middle of a pandemic, it felt like something was missing because I couldn’t really tour my EP. But then in the summer things opened up, and I got to play a lot of Danish festivals and that was a great experience. It was stressful, because everything had to be booked in such a short time, it felt a little bit chaotic, but it was a really, really, really nice feeling to get to play the songs live to people who were really grateful to be at festivals again.

Then I had my first headliner tour of the major Danish cities in December, and I got to play two of them before the big finale show in Copenhagen got cancelled. That was a hard one to swallow. But I’m going to tour a bunch of Danish satellite towns in February and March. I’m also going to the Faroe Islands to have my first headline show there. I think my agent is also working on getting me to Germany and the UK, but we’ll see restriction-wise what works.

I’m trying to just let myself be excited about it, but yeah, it’s hard after after everything. So many concerts have been postponed that I got tickets for ages ago. So while I’m doing the tour, I have all these great shows to fit in between. It’ll be a wild few months.

Finally, we always ask artists to recommend another band or artist that they’ve been listening to recently. Is there anyone you’d like to give a shout out to?

Sure. A pretty cool thing that happened, at least for my music listening habits during the pandemic, was that I started listening to a lot more local music. The energy was more focused, even in the media, with what was going on locally. A bunch of really, really cool stuff from from the Faroe Islands and Copenhagen has caught my attention way more than maybe it would have before. One of my favourites is eee gee. It’s very retro-pop, vulnerable but still sassy, with sort of a 60s tinge to it, but not overtly, so it still sounds modern. I’ve been really obsessed with this one song ‘killing it’.

And then, of course, my labelmate Greta. We have sort of had parallel paths for the last few years. We met nine years ago and we studied song-writing together and now we have the same manager too. She’s released some some new singles that are like ABBA-meets-Kate Bush-meets-Berlin 90s rave. It’s really, really cool. She became a mum in the middle of everything too and I especially like how she marketed her record with her big pregnant belly alongside this kind of Berlin techno music, I was like *chef’s kiss* this is great!

Pre-order Brimheim’s new album, can’t hate myself into a different shape, here

Follow Brimheim on bandcampSpotifyInstagram & Facebook

Photo Credit: Hey Jack

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

LISTEN: Brimheim – ‘This Week’s Laundry’

A stirring, intricately observed guitar tune about trying to cultivate a “normal” routine during a time of deep vulnerability, Danish alt-pop artist Brimheim has shared her latest single ‘this week’s laundry’. Taken from her upcoming album can’t hate myself into a different shape, which is set for release on 28th January via W.A.S Entertainment, the track flows with her tender vocals and confessional lyrics, which chime with relatable melancholy.

“The song is an inner monologue about keeping up appearances,” Brimheim explains. “Attempts at adjusting very mundane things in life to feel in control. The collection of specific actions in the song – like buying frozen beans, sorting laundry, and skipping lunch – are all somewhat failed approximations of normalcy and balance. In reality, they just thinly veil existential loneliness and insecurity. It’s someone trying to convince themselves and everyone around them that they’re fine, when they are actually barely keeping it together. It’s like they’re live action role playing as a responsible adult. The lyrics list all these things to point out their banal absurdity as well as their relatability.”

With realistic lines like “I put on foundation for my trip across the street / I am getting a new bag of frozen beans / ‘cause that’s a good way to sneak some greens into a meal / although fresh would be ideal” – Brimheim’s rich guitar sounds and exquisite emotional resilience shine through on ‘this week’s laundry’. She pulls herself back from the brink with an understated confidence, providing comfort for listeners who may be living through a similar experience.

Listen to ‘this week’s laundry’ below.

Follow Brimheim on bandcampSpotifyInstagram & Facebook

Photo Credit: Hey Jack

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut