WATCH: Fortitude Valley – ‘Baby, I’m Afraid’

‘Baby, I’m afraid’ might be the soundtrack to the rest of my summer. Following previous single ‘Cassini‘, it’s the latest offering from the wonderful Durham band Fortitude Valley and, once again, they’ve given us another perfect pop banger.

As far as break-up songs go, ‘Baby, I’m Afraid’ is anything but a weepie. It’s as bouncy as it is bittersweet, reminiscent of Weezer at their very best (and by that, I am, of course, talking Pinkerton). While the lyrics, about the last days of a relationship, are tinged with sadness, they’re lifted by the spiky guitar riffs and pure punk drums, which collide brilliantly with front-person Laura Kovic’s shoegaze-inspired, bubblegum vocals. The result is truly euphoric.

Of the track, Kovic explains:

This is a break up song. It’s two people feeling that the vibe is off, but not communicating. It’s about feeling insecure, over analysing little things and assuming the worst rather than actually speaking to the other person.”

Like Fortitude Valley’s earlier singles, ‘Baby, I’m Afraid’ is a total earworm too. Just what is this witchcraft?! After only a few listens, it’s wedged itself firmly into my brain and into my heart, but, you know what? I’m fine with that.

Watch the new video for ‘Baby, I’m Afraid’ here:

The debut album from Fortitude Valley is set for release on 29th October via Fika Recordings. Pre-order here.

Vic Conway
@thepicsofvic

Five Favourites: DRAMA

Following a recent sold-out show at London’s Heaven, Chicago duo DRAMA have just released their debut album and are fast becoming firm favourites here at Get In Her Ears.

Fusing together an eclectic mix of house production, jazz-infused hooks and catchy hip-hop beats, DRAMA create poignant offerings reflecting on every day emotion, propelled by the captivating soulful power of Via Rosa’s vocals.

We think one of the best ways to get to know an artist is by asking what music inspires them or influences their writing. We caught up with Via Rosa, who has shared her “Five Favourites” – five albums that particularly resonate with her. Check out her choices below, and make sure you watch their new video for ‘Years’ at the bottom of this post.

Brandy – Brandy
I remember the day my mom took me to Waterloo Records in Austin, Texas. She asked this guy “My daughter wants to listen to hip-hop/RnB can you help me find something for her?” He sent us into the little listening room in the record store and played this album. The minute the first track dropped I looked at my mom like “Yes! I want this!” I played that tape front to back ’til it didn’t play anymore. I just loved it. Looking back, I think it had a lot to do with it being the first album I was allowed to have a say in owning. Before that I was only allowed to listen to what my parents listened to.

N SYNC – *NSYNC
This is obviously me rebelling. I spent so many years listening to my parent’s reggae and mo-town collection that I wanted something completely different. I fell hard for N Sync, later to find out I really fell for Max Martin who was writing everyone’s hits in the ’90s. I mean, how could a young girl not love those catchy heartbreak songs? I had never even been in a relationship and I still somehow felt that shit! Every song was like an open wound. I defended’s honour for many years, and for my 9th birthday my dad bought me tickets to their concert! That changed my life 100% because that show was flawless.

Sade – Live
My mom played a lot of Sade’s music. We would stay up together and watch her live shows on VHS, sometime even dance ’til the sun came up, listening to and watching this album and video. I memorised the set list and all the transitions. I memorised her outfit changes and what she would say between songs and the band solos. Not because I had plans of being on stage, but just ’cause I absolutely loved them. People have compared our sounds and while it wasn’t on purpose, it’s definitely not a coincidence either. If I had to pinpoint a moment and album in life that sparked the fan girl in me, it would definitely be this one.

Ludacris – Word Of Mouf 
This was the first rap album I bought with my own money. I thought the album cover was fantastic because it made me laugh. I’m pretty sure that’s why I bought it, because I definitely didn’t know who he was beforehand. It probably wasn’t the smartest purchase considering I was only about twelve or thirteen at the time. I felt like the coolest kid ever with that album in my collection. He was so animated and funny while still being honest, real and entertaining. It took my parents a long time to let me listen to mainstream rap music, but Ludacris was my introduction to that world, so I’ll forever be grateful for that album. I still think it’s one of the best ever made.

Weezer – Pinkerton 
I had a crush on a boy and he asked me if I had heard of Weezer. I instantly replied “Oh yeah, of course. I love them”, knowing damn well all I only really was NSYNC and Backstreet Boys. I guess I lied because I knew it would make me look cool. I must have been about eight years old or something. But then when I actually did listen to that album I liked it A LOT. The songs are amazingly written! The music is perfect! The cover!? AMAZING. Then there I was, a Weezer fan. The boy crush didn’t last, of course, but I went on to cherish this album for many years. I just think it’s really well put together from start to finish, which is not an easy thing to do.

Massive thanks to Via Rosa for sharing her Five Favourites! 

DRAMA’s debut album Dance Without Me is out now. Watch the video for new single ‘Years’ below:

Photo Credit: Zoe Rain

Track Of The Day: Gold Baby – ‘Philadelphia’

A dreamy lamentation about going too far, but realizing it way too late; Gold Baby‘s new single ‘Philadelphia’ is a bittersweet indie ballad that brims with buoyant guitar sounds and front woman Siân’s charming vocals.

The London-based band have undergone lineup changes over the few months, but members Siân and Scott have shown resilience in the face of adversity, and are now supported by loyal friends and musicians when playing live as a full band.

Described as “what it might sound like if Norah Jones wrote a Weezer song”, Gold Baby blend catchy, melodic guitar sounds with confessional lyricism, and latest single ‘Philadelphia’ is another shining example of this. Mixing the narratives of a night spent lost in Pennsylvania, with that of a Mexican fisherman lost at sea; Siân’s ambiguous lyrics will conjure up images of strange familiarity, even if you can’t directly relate to the track’s context.

Gold Baby will be releasing more new music in 2020, but before that, they’ll be playing live for us at The Finsbury Pub on Friday 8th November alongside Cozy Slippers, Macadamia Sluts, and a secret headliner…(event details here). Listen to ‘Philadelphia’ below and follow the band on Facebook for more updates.

Kate Crudgington
@KCBobCut

Five Favourites: Dude York

Set to release their new album next week, Seattle trio Dude York pay tribute to adolescent romance and early noughties ‘mall punk’ with their whirring scuzz, catchy jangling hooks and gritty vocals. And we cannot get enough.

We think one of the best ways to get to know a new band/artist is by asking them what music inspired them to write in the first place. We caught up with Claire from Dude York to talk about her ‘Five Favourites’ – five songs or albums that have influenced her songwriting techniques, or simply take her back to a specific feeling or time. Check out her choices below, and make sure you watch the band’s new video for ‘Should’ve’ at the end of this post.

Jimmy Eat World – ‘Your House’
This is one of my absolute favourite songs and Jimmy Eat World in general was a big influence for me on our new record. Play this song very loud driving somewhere sentimental in your car, you might feel feelings! Our single ‘Falling’ is kind of about falling in love in your late 20s to the soundtrack of your early teens, and it’s supposed to start as a sonic reference to this song (and a lyrical reference to Dashboard Confessional if anyone is keeping track). I think there’s a lot to admire about this band; I love how expressive Jim Adkins’ voice is without being cloying, and the way he uses harmonies really intentionally and loud. Bleed American in its entirety is a pop record that can’t or at least shouldn’t be pigeonholed, it moves through totally different sounds seamlessly. They are masters of wordless bridges and hooks, so good lyrics would probably just mess them up. I have also done the important experimental research on a few tours now: If you wear a Jimmy Eat World shirt you will only meet nice people and have pleasant conversations, it’s a good energy.

No Doubt – ‘Sixteen’
I remember listening to this song with fresh ears when I was first starting to make music which required a.) figuring out how to sing and b.) figuring out how to write harmonies. The first 30 seconds stopped me dead in my tracks when I realized Gwen Stefani’s basically just yelling? In key? And it actually sounds amazing?!? At the time I didn’t have much of a singing range basically because I was afraid to be loud or sound bad at all before getting it right, but I loved how these harmonies sounded so I tried singing them alone in the car or the basement to see if it was even possible to hit that note and when I did it I felt like I had unlocked a superpower. It’s hard to choose a No Doubt song though, so I have to give honourable mention to ‘Simple Kind Of Life’ for having some of the most inspirational lyrical honesty and delivery for me. I always felt it was a special song in that way, but revisiting it this year at the same age she wrote it (and let’s just say during my Saturn return, although I think it may have been a few months late), it hits me that much harder. When she says “you seem like you’d be a good dad” you can actually hear the smirk on her face and it’s the best.

Yuck – ‘Operation’
I just love so much about how this song sounds. I’m not always drawn to vocals being mixed way down or being so fuzzy you can barely tell what they’re saying because it can feel intentionally buried, but in this song everything has enough space to be appreciated. The vocals are just another fuzzy instrument, not more or less important in the melody than the guitars and it all trades off with every section elevating into the next effortlessly. So I guess what I’m trying to say is, I think this song is (bad pun intended) well designed. And just really good.

Weezer – ‘I’m Your Daddy’
Weezer is a huge influence on me and sure, maybe I wouldn’t even play guitar if it wasn’t for “the early stuff” but that’s not as funny as this song. I’ve had a side project Weezer cover band for MANY years (despite only playing something like 5 shows) with a very specific premise: we play only songs the casual fan has never heard of and the serious fan hates. Usually, if I’m getting ready for one of these shows I’ll be playing the songs at Dude York practice and Peter or Andrew will say “what’s that?” and I’ll say “Goat Reward” and they’ll say “oh” or “maybe it should be a Dude York song?” and usually it’s too hard to divorce myself from the source material to even consider it, but I have to admit I did it with this song! I don’t remember whether it was before or after that but around the same time I heard the Rivers Cuomo episode of Song Exploder and he described doing essentially the same thing as part of his song writing process, copying something from a song he liked and then distancing himself and intentionally hiding the source material until he can’t remember where it came from, revisiting it and writing a new song around it. So that’s how I know it’s ok. He wouldn’t mind, he does it too.

Josie and the Pussycats – The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
This movie came out when I was 11 years old and every single one of my friends had the soundtrack, knew every word, and we were all saying the same thing back and forth to each other, “Why isn’t this a real band? Why is this so much better than any real bands? Why can’t whoever made this soundtrack just become a real band because this is probably so much better than whatever they are doing right now?” This is obviously the narrow view of a pre-teen with limited googling ability in 2001, but in retrospect I think there was still some truth in it. The soundtrack really resonated with me at the time because the idea of this band from the movie coupled with the songs to back it up hit a sweet spot between the energetic sound of the dude rock bands on the radio I was leaning towards and the feminine energy I could actually relate to. That’s not to say those bands didn’t exist and thankfully I think there are more now than ever, but at the time it was hard for me to find anything that satisfied quite like Josie. We played a halloween covers show in 2014 where we dressed up as the Pussycats and played three of the songs and it was so fun. They were just fun to play and sounded great! Or at least I think they did, there’s no video evidence and it was a DIY show… But I think it re-opened the door to those songs in my mind, there’s no reason why bands like Josie and the Pussycats can’t be real. 

Massive thanks to Dude York for sharing their awesome Five Favourites with us! 

Falling, the upcoming album from Dude York, is out 26th July via Hardly Art. Watch the video for latest single ‘Should’ve’ here: